DOVER KENT ARCHIVES
PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Paul Skelton

Earliest 1625-

St. Crispin

Open 2014+

The Street

(Worth)

01304 612081

St. Crispin 2011 St. Crispin 2011 St. Crispin sign 2011

Above photos taken by Paul Skelton, September 17, 2011.

St. Crispin at Worth

Photo above is of the St. Crispin in Worth, date unknown.

St. Crispin painting 1992

By kind permission of the St. Crispin from a painting of 1992.

St. Crispin date unknown

Above picture by kind permission of the "St. Crispin," date unknown.

St. Crispin date unknown

Above picture by kind permission of the "St. Crispin," date unknown.

Crispin Inn at Worth, card

Taken from a card issued by the pub, date unknown.

 

One of the original tied houses of Thompson and Sons brewery at Walmer.

This house was, reputedly owned by an 'ale wife' who was married to one of Henry V's soldiers after their return from Agincourt. Henry's army was supplied with locally brewed beer from the Deal and Walmer area, under the terms of the Confederation of the Cinque Ports.

This pub was sold along with another 11 public houses in neighbouring villages in 1826. The sum was 625 for this house but it is not known from who or to whom.

The following has been take from their web site at the following address http://www.stcrispininn.com

 

Situate and being in the upper half hundred of Eastry lathe of St Augustine, lies the parish of Worth, written in Saxon text as Wealth, then later word, or occasionally Woad. There within the parish boundaries can be found the St Crispin Inn.

This tenement was built during the reign of Henry V (1413-1422) in the year 1420. It was originally a farmhouse forming part of the estate of the Nebynson family of Eastry, who came to settle there during the reign of Edward III (1327-1377). It was here that the Reeve lived. The Reeve was the overseer or foreman who acted for the Lord of the Manor. The earliest recorded occupant of the house is one Nathaniel Foysters, overseer and farmer who resided here in 1493. For most of the sixteenth century the house was occupied by tenant farmers bound to the estate of Nebynson.

In 1625 the property was split from the estate and sold with 7 acres of arable land to one Clement Gardner, farmer and shipping agent, formerly of Sandwich. He resided in and owned the property until his death here in 1653, after which it was transferred by right of descendancy to his nephew Avery Gardner, malt and hop brewer of Dover. In 1668 he sold the property to his brother Amos, also a brewer of Dover, for 175 guineas. Included in the sale inventory was a "brewehouse, 5 wassails (drinking mugs) a mare, harness and saddle, and 15 chickens". Amos Gardner held the property until 1682 whereupon he sold it to one Abraham Skulley, brewer and common beer-seller of Sandwich. In 1690 he was granted a common ale and cider licence and the house became a registered but untitled ale house.

In 1712 he sold a now flourishing ale establishment to one Michael Ambrose, shoemaker and beer seller of Goddington, near the town of Ashford. The family of Ambrose were for many years shoe-makers at Ashford, so in keeping with tradition, Michael Ambrose called the house "The Crispin", after Saint Crispin and Saint Crispinian, who were the patron saints of shoemakers. He registered the house under this title and, for some reason, omitted the word 'Saint'. This was not added until 1906 when one Edward Minter became keeper.

In 1767 Joshua Hawkins, keeper of this inn for twenty three years, died. In his last will and testament he bequeathed the inn, all his chattels and belongings to his wife Fanny, on condition that she remain a widow for the rest of her nature life, never remarrying and therefore remaining faithful to the spirit of her dead husband. This was a strange request for, when he died, Joshua Hawkins was 74 years old and his wife 73. She remained a widow and died here in 1772.

Worth, though only a small parish, extended then as far as the coast line - notorious for smugglers, who were known to have used the Crispin. Reward posters were often hung in the inn as a deterrent against those committing the offences or as an incentive for those who wished to inform. In 1790, the Crispin became the post house where the mail was collected and sorted and quite often the task of delivering fell upon the shoulders of the resident keeper, a tradition that lasted well into the nineteenth century. Inquests on bodies washed ashore were held here throughout the nineteenth century. In 1857, a collision occurred between a barge and a sailing ship, resulting in the loss of sixteen lives. Each one of the corpses was carried on the shoulders of men from the beach to a lodge at the rear of the inn, to await the coroner.

From 1850 until the turn of the twentieth century, innkeepers from other inns and taverns would hold meetings here. They came to discuss business and collect their spirits, for during this period the Crispin was the spirit wholesalers. A business set up by one Charles Lepine in 1850. Lepine was for many years the post master of the parish.

The St Crispin has seen many changes since first it was built, but its character remains unchanged. So, stay, enjoy the fayre and reflect on those bygone days.

 

From the Deal, Walmer, and Sandwich Mercury, 29 May, 1869. 1d.

J. KIDDER. CRISPIN INN, WORTH

Begs to announce that he has taken the above Old-established INN and trusts by attending assiduously to the comfort of his guests, and keeping a first-class article always in stock, to receive a share of public support.

Good accommodation for TEA PARTIES, Bowling-green, Stabling, &c., &c.

 

From the Deal, Walmer, and Sandwich Mercury, 24 March, 1900.

MALTREATING A LANDLORD

John William Hinchcliffe and Robert Atkinson were charged with assaulting William Ward, landlord of the "Crispin," Worth, on the previous day.

The prosecutor said the two men had been working at Worth for the last week. He returned home about 5 p.m. the previous day and found them at his house. They were served with beer in the tap-room. Witness went to his tea and afterwards returned to the tap-room, as the men were using bad language. He remonstrated with them, and Atkinson then threatened him and wanted him to fight. He continued to use bad language, and prosecutor took hold of him and put him out of the door. The man then turned and tried to strike him. Hinchcliffe also left and both returned and burst open the door. Atkinson again struck out at him and Hinchliffe encouraged him, and eventually the latter took up a pint glass and threw it at prosecutor, striking him on the head. He received wounds in five places, and had to be attended by Dr. Chidley.

William Michelthwaite corroborated the prosecutor's evidence. He said when the latter returned to the tap-room the men asked for more beer and the landlord refused to serve them, and as they continued to use the same filthy language Mr. Ward put Atkinson outside. The prosecutor then bolted the door and the men kicked it and burst it open. They came inside and Atkinson again struck Mr. Ward and Hinchcliffe threw a pint glass at him. The glass caught a slanting piece of partition and broke, the pieces striking the landlord's head. The latter was led to the kitchen, and witness bathed his head.

The Magistrates sentenced each to 14 days with hard labour.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent News, Friday, 4 November, 1910.

WINGHAM PETTY SESSIONS

Mr. A. M. White, of the "Crispin," Worth, applied for an extension from 10 to 12 p.m. on the 17th inst, on the occasion of the annual dinner of the Horticultural Society. - Granted.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent News, Friday, 7 September, 1923. Price 1d.

LICENSING

The licensee of the "St. Crispin," Worth, was granted an extension for a harvest supper on September 20th.

 

The following four photographs have kindly been sent by Chris Excel, who says they are his ancestors and friends enjoying Thompson Walmer Ales at the St. Crispin at Worth in the 1930s.

St Crispin 1930s St Crispin 1930s St Crispin 1930s St Crispin 1930s

 

From the Dover Express, Thursday 10 February, 2005.

SHOPS AND PUBS REWARDED FOR EXCELLENCE

The ancient inn of St. Crispin at Worth, near Deal, has won the annual competition to find the best pub for tourists in the Dover district.

The result of the competition, run by the White Cliffs Country Tourism Association, were announced this week.

St. Crispin Inn has recently changed hands, but when the association's team of judges secretly visited Jane and Terry O'Brien were in charge.

Two months ago plumber and heating engineer Tyrone Mayes acquired the lease of the pub. The building is owned by Enterprise Inns.

Mr. Mayes, who continues to work as a plumber, said: "I had been drinking as a customer at St. Crispin for 20 years."

He liked the place so much he bought the lease.

The attractive property, once a farmhouse, was built in 1420 and is believed to be haunted.

In joint second place in the competition were the "King's Head" in Beach Street, Deal, and the "Crown Inn" at Finglesham.

About 20 pubs were nominated by customers and were visited by association judges.

 

From the Dover Mercury, Thursday 17 February, 2005.

Tyrone Mayes, St Crispin, Worth 2005



Historic Inn is 'best for tourists'

THE ancient inn of St Crispin at Worth has won the annual competition to find the best pub for tourists in the Dover district.

In a secret visit, the White Cliffs Country Tourism Association judges agreed it was the finest in the area.

St Crispin Inn, which is also a restaurant, has changed hands and when the WCCTA team visited the public house Jane and Terry O'Brien were in charge.

But plumber and heating engineer Tyrone Mayes bought the 21-year lease of the pub. The building is owned by Enterprise Inns.

Mr Mayes, who continues to work as a plumber, said: "I had been drinking as a customer at St Crispin for some 20 years." He liked the place so much he acquired the lease.

The property, once a  farmhouse, was built in 1420 and some say it is haunted.

In joint second place in the competition were the King's Head in Beach Street, Deal, and The Crown Inn at Finglesham. About 20 pubs were nominated by customers and were visited by the WCCTA judges.

 

From the Dover Mercury, 18 August, 2011. 70p

NEW OWNERS AT VILLAGE INN

Siobhan and Chantel Heard

FAMILY BUSINESS: sisters Siobhan and Chantal Heard at the "St Crispin Inn" in Worth.

 

The "St Crispin Inn" the beautiful traditional 15th century pub in the village of Worth, is now under new ownership.

Mike Heard always liked the public house in The Street and has lived in and been associated with the community for more than 25 years.

So with a long-time ambition to buy an inn to run as a family business, his dream has now come true, with a little help from daughters Siobhan and Chantal.

 Siobhan said: "I am managing the "St Crispin" and my younger sister works at the pub too, so this is very much family run.

The "St Crispin" is on the edge of the village, with plenty of parking at the front and back, a large garden, as well as six en suite bed and breakfast rooms.

It is also the ideal place for a wedding or function, with a big marquee in the garden that can cater for up to 100 people.

Since the family took ever at the end of June it has already successfully hosted three marriages as well as a 30th birthday perty.

Siobhan has worked in pubs before so has a wealth of knowledge about the trade.

She said: "Running the business is a new and exciting venture for me, we want to promote the "St Crispin" as a top venue for weddings and all sorts of functions.

"We have just introduced a new a la carte menu for evening meals. We have an impressive bar menu for lunch times and we also do special senior citizens, meals.

"We only serve the best local produce which is all home-cooked. On the real ale front we promise at least three different guest ales too."

The family has lots of plans for the "St Crispin" and lots of ideas for its future.

 

 

Visit their web site at www.stcrispininn.com

 

LICENSEE LIST

GARDNER Clement 1625-53

GARDNER Avery 1653-68

GARDNER Amos 1668-82

SKULLEY Abraham 1682-1702 (registered as beer-house in 1690)

AMBROSE Michael 1702-14 (finally named The Crispin)

DYKE Elias 1714-27

LANCY (to be updated)

HAWKINS Joshua 1744-67

HAWKINS Mrs Fanny 1767-72

DURBAN James 1847+ Bagshaw's Directory 1847

LEPINE Charles 1850+

KIDDER J June/1869+ Deal Mercury

SMITH Richard 1882 Post Office Directory 1882

ELLIS Edward 1899+ Kelly's 1899

Last pub licensee had WARD William 1900+ Next pub licensee had Deal MercuryDover Express

MASTER Edward 1900-Nov/1908 Dover Express

BANKS to Sept/1904 Dover Express

MINTER J T Sept/1904+ Dover Express (Of Faversham)

WHITE Arthur W Nov/1908-10+ Dover Express

EXCELL Frederick Thomas 1913+ Post Office Directory 1913

SOLLEY Mary Elizabeth to Oct/1933 Dover Express

JACKMAN bernard Joseph Oct/1933+ Dover Express

TUCKER Cyril to Apr/1953 Dover Express

GOODGER Charles Apr/1953+ Dover Express

MANDER Cyril J 1974+ Library archives 1974 Owned by Cyril J Mander

Last pub licensee had LENHAM Geoff & Randy date unknown

MAYERS Tye & CHECKSFIELD Diane 2005+

HEARD Mike & Siobhan Aug/2011+

 

Post Office Directory 1882From the Post Office Directory 1882

Post Office Directory 1913From the Post Office Directory 1913

Bagshaw's Directory 1847From Bagshaw Directory 1847

Kelly's 1899From the Kelly's Directory 1899

Library archives 1974Library archives 1974

Dover ExpressFrom the Dover Express

Deal MercuryFrom the Deal Walmer & Sandwich Mercury

 

If anyone should have any further information, or indeed any pictures or photographs of the above licensed premises, please email:-

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