DOVER KENT ARCHIVES

Page Updated:- Friday, 30 September, 2022.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Paul Skelton

Earliest 1740-

Griffin's Head

Open 2020+

Chillenden

01304 840325

https://www.griffinsheadchillenden.co.uk/

https://www.facebook.com/griffinsheadchillenden/

https://whatpub.com/griffins-head

Griffin Head 1900

Above postcard, circa 1900, kindly sent by Rory Kehoe.

Griffins Head 1930

Above photo, 1930, with kind permission of Eric Hartland.

Griffin's Head 2011

Griffin's head, taken by Paul Skelton, 11 June 2011.

Griffin's Head

Griffins Head, Chillenden. Photo kindly supplied by Kim Hollingshead, April 2011.

Griffin's Head

Above photo by Kim Hollingshead, showing the pub on their vintage car day 2010.

Griffin's Head fireplace

Photo by Kim Hollingshead, showing the inside of the pub.

Griffin's Head Sign

Above sign 2011.

Griffin's head date unknown

Above postcard, date unknown.

Griffin's Head sign 1991Griffin's Head sign 1994

Griffin's head sign left July 1991, sign right April 1994.

Above with thanks from Brian Curtis www.innsignsociety.com

Griffin's Head beer mat 1955

Above beer mat 1955, kindly sent by Rory Kehoe.

Griffin's Head 2018

Above photo by Rory Kehoe September 2018.

 

The Griffin was half bird/half lion, and the pub is a listed building of antiquity, was once the property of the D'Aeth family, lords of the manor for several generations. The fabulous creature was on their family crest.

 

Earliest reference found so far is in the Wingham Division Ale Licence list, which shows the "Griffin's Head," Chillenden, to be re-licensed for the sum of 8 shillings in 1740 indicating that the pub was present before 1740.

A wonderful ancient pub, the Griffins Head has been part of everyday life in the Domesday village of Chillenden for many centuries.

Inside the pub is a picture frame containing the following information. I am not certain when it was written but would guess at during the 1980s:-

In the hundred of Eastry, lathe of St. Augustines lies the parish of Chillenden and there within the boundaries can be found the inn known as the "Griffins Head." Written in the Domesday Survey (1086) as Cilledene, Chillenden has derived its name from its low and cold situation.

The inn was built during the reign of Edward I (1272-1307) in the year 1286 and was originally a farmhouse forming part of the estate of one John de Chillenden, whose family took their name from and possessed the parish, until the 6th year of the reign of Henry IV (1399-1413) when it came into the possession of the Baker family of Caldham in Capel near Folkestone. During their term of ownership the property was given up to the church of All Saints for the monks to reside and farm the land thereto belonging. It remained part of the priory until 1539, when came the final dissolution of monasteries under the tyranny of Henry VII (1507-1549).

At this date the parish fell into the hands of one Gason of Apulton in Ickham and the property again became a farm consisting of "1 messauge, 15 acres of arable land, 6 planted with hopes, 1 wooded parcele of lande, 1 brewe house and detachede kitchen adjoining. At the turn of the sixteenth century the parish was sold to one Hammond of St. Albans, in Nonington who leased the property to a number of small tenant farmers. In 1634, one Joshua Smaite was in occupation here with his wife Meg, and six children. Smaite paid a weekly rent of 3 shillings and 6 pence, plus one pence for a plough share.

No land within the parish was exempt from the payment of tithe and by the turn of the seventeenth century all tithes collected were paid from this house. Ales and ciders have been brewed here for centuries and eventually in order that the rector could hold tithe suppers here, a license was granted to the house in 1743. One Elias Sloper was the first keeper of the house, then an untitled but registered ale house. The property and the parish was still then owned by the Hammond family.

In 1766, with the awareness of the coaching era, the property situated on the then main Canterbury to Deal road was given a full license and registered under the title of the "Griffins Head" a sign said to derive from the coat of arms of the Hammond family.

In 1809, the parish was split and the inn was sold to one Thomas Pettit, carpenter and wheelwright of the parish of Adisham who as well as running the inn opened a carpenters shop in an adjoining building and for many years a sign advertising this service hung outside the inn, when he died in 1842 he bequeathed the inn with its land and his carpentry business to his wife Sarah who was also a wheelwright, she carried on the business until 1850 when her son William took over. In 1895 one Thomas Saomes took over the inn. Soames was for many years a carrier to the parish, who when called upon would ride to intercept coaches with parcels or news.

The "Griffins Head" has seen and undergone many changes since first it was built. It started life as a wealden hall house and is now being caringly restored by its present owner. But although changes have taken place the historical character and atmosphere remains unchanged. So stay, enjoy the fayre and reflect on those bygone days.

 

According to Shepherd Neame, who now own the pub it was built during the reign of Edward I in 1286, originally as a farmhouse forming part of the estate of John de Chillenden until 1405, the building next came into the possession of the Baker family. During their ownership, it was given to the monks of All Saints Church, who farmed the land until 1539 - when they fell to victim to Henry VIII's dissolution of the monasteries. It remained a farm until the mid-18th century.

Ales and ciders had been brewed here for centuries and in 1743 a licence was granted so that the rector could hold suppers here. In 1766, with the dawn of the coaching era and the property being on the main Canterbury to Deal road, it was given a full licence and registered under the title of the Griffins Head.

Today, the Griffins Head is extremely popular, especially with the local Kent cricketing fraternity. The food is excellent, the beers are Shepherd Neame and its been voted 'Wine Pub of the Year'.

Also has facilities for Bat and Trap.

At the time of writing (2011) the landlord, Jerry Copestake has helicopter landing facilities in a field behind his house nearby – some customers do use it! There is also a strong farming element within its locals, and a rally of vintage and veteran cars is held there every first Sunday of the month.

Still a Shepherd Neame house, dogs are allowed in the upper bar if on a lead and not noisy and children are not allowed in the pub.

Superbly run by Jerry and Karen Copestake. The landlord has something of a reputation! He doesn't suffer fools gladly and if you behave in a crass fashion you will be told so in no uncertain terms and serve you right!

The Griffin's Head doesn't claim to be a gastro pub - it just IS one but doesn't feel the need to jump on the makeover/label bandwagon. It has too much taste for that!

The quality of the food and wine list is remarkable. There is no permanent menu but the menu changes according to the seasons. Despite not being on the menus they are happy to make sandwiches or provide a bowl of chips/cheesy chips. You will not be disappointed by the food itself or the presentation of the dishes. The wine list is extensive.

There is a tiny smock mill to the north of the village to complete the picture of the idyllic English pub.

 

From the Kentish Gazette, Wednesday, 22 June to Saturday, 25 June, 1768. Price 2d

TO BE SOLD BY AUCTION

On Monday the 27th of June instant, at Three o'clock in the afternoon, at the sign of the “Griffin's Head,” in Chillenden.

A Freehold Messuage, or Tenement, with the Outhouse or Building, Yard, Garden, and Land thereunto belonging, containing together about half an acre, little more or less, situate, lying and being in Chillingden Street, now in the occupation of Benjamin Pittock.

For further particulars, inquire of Mr. Farbrace, attorney, at Dover.

 

Kentish Weekly Post or Canterbury Journal 08 October 1822.

On Thursday last, Mr. Wm. Davis, of Nonington, having completed the 50th year of his office, as clerk of that parish, the principal inhabitants invited him to partake of a dinner provided on the occasion at the "Griffin's Head Inn." It is but just to say, that this worthy old man has conducted himself through life so as to enjoy the esteem of his neighbours, amongst whom he has for 63 years, displayed his vocal powers in the choir of the church. The day was spent in perfect harmony, and the cheerfulness of Mr. Davis, although 87 years of age, added much to the conviviality of the occasion.

 

From the Dover Telegraph, 5 January 1850.

The Dover Telegraph reported the death of landlady Mrs Rose Brooks on 5th January 1850.

 

Kentish Gazette, 1 August 1854.

NOTICE,

ALL Persons who have any claim or demand on the Estate of the late Mr JOHN PETTIT, Carpenter and Wheeler of the "Griffin's head," in the parish of CHILLENDEN, Kent, are requested to send the same to his Widow, Mrs. Harriet Pettit, on or before the twenty-first day of August, 1854, in order that they may be examined.

Chillenden, July 29, 1854.

 

Kentish Gazette, 19 September 1854.

CHILLENDEN, NEAR WINGHAM.

TO WHEELWRIGHTS CARPENTERS, &c. &c., TO BE LET AT MICHAELMAS.

THE "GRIFFIN’S HEAD INN," CHILLENDEN,

A Free Public-House, with Carpenter's and Wheelwright's Shop, with or without Seven or Eight Acres of Land attached. The Wheelwright's and Carpenter’s business is of considerable extent, and has been carried on for many years, and an excellent opportunity now offers of continuing.

Possession to be had at Michaelmas next, and further particulars may be obtained on application to Messrs. Collard and Ashenden, Estate Agents and Surveyors, Westgate, Canterbury.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent News, Friday 17 August, 1923. Price 1d.

LICENSING BUSINESS

An occasional licence was granted to the "Griffin's Head," Chillenden, for a sports meeting at the football ground, Tilmanstone, on Saturday.

 

From the Dover Express and East Kent News, Friday, 5 October, 1923. Price 1d.

LICENSING

An occasional licence was granted to Mr. Kelly, of the "Griffin's Head," Chillenden, for the annual Ploughing Match at Knowlton on November 1st.

 

Dover Express. Friday 11 February 1938.

Damages for Chillenden accident.

An accident Chillingden had a sequel at Canterbury County Court on Tuesday, when Sidney Owen Graves (17) Saddlers Hill, Goodnestone, through his father, sued Harold Edward Cage, Shooters Dean, Eythorne, for damages for personal injuries.

Mr. Alan Gordon appeared for plaintive and Mr. Russell Vick, K.C., and Mr. R. Graham Dow were for defendant.

Mr. Gordon said that special damages have been agreed at 23 15s. 11 d. subject to liability. A medical report, which had also been agreed, show the plaintiff had a slight outwood bowing of the left leg and he still walks with a limp.

Sydney Owen Graves (17) a lorry drivers mate, said his father was a haulage contractor and he works for him. On April 27th, he went into the yard of the "Griffins Head" to get some toffee from an automatic machine. When he left the yard of the "Griffins Head" he turned right. There was no need to cross the road and he had no intention of doing so. It was dusk. As he turned into the right he saw the light and stood still. He was then about six inches from the wall of the public house. A motorcycle came straight at him and the nearside footrest struck witnesses left leg. At the moment of impact he was facing the direction from which the motorcycle was coming. He had no warning from the motorcycle and did not see any other traffic on the road at the time. He was taken to the Kent and Canterbury Hospital and was detained for two months.

In cross-examination, witness said he was certain the motorcycle had a dimmed headlight. Defendants seemed to swerve into witness. His speed was about 30 miles an hour.

P.C. Honey Tilmanstone said he found plaintive lying by the corner of the wall of the "Griffins Head Inn." Defendant was being attended by his pillion rider, a lady, whom he had since married. The road was 16 feet. 8 inches. Wide and there was a 3ft. skid mark opposite where plaintiff was lying.

William Martin Kelly, licensee of the "Griffins Head," stated that he saw Graves walk to the toffee machine, and then walk to the road. He then heard a crash, and on going outside, he saw Graves lying on the ground with his head 6 to 12 inches from the wall.

This was the case for plaintive.

Arthur W. Reeve said he was a friend of plaintive, and on the day in question cycled out of the yard, Graves followed him out. When witness reached the road he saw a motorcycle coming from his right. He did not notice any light on the motorcycle. He just got across to the other side and stopped against the bank. He intended to warn Graves about the motorcycle coming, but it appears that Graves walked out of the yard into the front wheel.

Defendant said he had been driving motor vehicles for 10 years, and for some years he have been driving East Kent buses but, first at Deal and latterly at Canterbury. On the night in question he was riding near the "Griffins Head" at 10 to 15 miles an hour, and it was quite light. He had no light on the machine. As he came towards the corner of the Inn he saw a cyclist come from the yard of the public house. He passed across the front of the motorcycle. Almost at the same instant he saw a blur, felt a bump and was off at his motorcycle.

Mr. Vick submitted that negligence by defendant had not been proved, and said that the marks on the road disproved plaintiffs case that he was the only a few inches from the wall of the public house.

His honour, giving judgement, said plaintiff might have come out of the forecourt of the public house with more care, but defendant should have been riding at a speed at which he could have stopped dead if anyone came out of the yard. He should also have sounded his hooter. The accident was, in his opinion, due to the negligence of defendants, there would be judgement for plaintiff for 150 with costs.

 

Dover Express 11 November 1938.

BICYCLE RETURNED.

John Henry Burton, of Nonington, was summoned for converting a bicycle belonging to William Hill (East Kent) Ltd., to his own use whilst the bailee of same at Nonington between 30th April and July 1st.

Defendant pleaded not guilty.

Mr. Gerald Hardman (Deal) prosecuted. William Hill, Managing Director William Hill (East Kent) Ltd. of Deal, said that he had previously supplied defendant with a bicycle which had been paid for. He let him have the one in question under a hire purchase agreement and 3 17s. 6d. was owing under the agreement. He had seen defendant several times in reference to the payments and on one occasion he said he was going through hard times so witness said he would be easy on the instalments. He warned him that he must not part with the bicycle, but on going to the "Griffin's Head Inn" he saw the bicycle there.

William Martin Kelly, licensee of the "Griffin's Head Inn," Chillenden, said that he bought the bicycle from defendant for 1.

The Chairman: You must have thought you had a very good bargain.

Defendant said that he was sorry for what had happened, and was willing to pay the money back.

Supt. Webb said that defendant had a very good character.

Fined 10s. and it was ordered that the bicycle be returned to Mr. Hill.

 

From the Dover Express, 2 July, 1971.

Griffin's Head 1971

The advert, with picture shown above showed Keith Davis as proprietor and the following text:-

Our Specialities:- Scampi in the basket 40p, Chicken a la Maison 50p, Snacks, Buffet, Parties catered for, Chillenden, near Wingham, Tel. Nonington 325.

 

From the Dover Mercury, 17 March 2016.

Husband-and-wife licensees retire after 30 years in charge of historic pub.

Karen & Jerry Copestake

Hundreds of staff and customers attend landlords’ farewell party.

After three decades behind the bar at the Griffin’s Head in Chillenden, licensee Jerry Copestake and wife Karen retired this week.

More than 500 customers and former staff flocked to the historic Shepherd Neame pub for a surprise send-off party on Sunday, March 13.

As an extra special surprise, the Copestake’s 28-year-old son, Nick, flew over from his home in Canada to celebrate with his parents and older brother Mark.

The pub was decorated with photos of the couple during the past 30 years, and they were presented with a decanter and other gifts to mark the occasion.

Mr Copestake, 70, said: “It was such a shock when I turned up at the pub and saw so many friends and family had gathered to celebrate with us. We had a brilliant time.”

He first started his pub career in 1973, running the "Fox and Hounds" in Romney Street, Sevenoaks then the "Plough" in Hildenborough, before joining Shepherd Neame in the early 1980s, running the "Woolpack" in Chilham and then taking over the "Griffin’s Head" with Karen in 1986.

Built during the time of Edward I, the pub was originally a farmhouse until 1405. In 1766 it became the fully licensed "Griffin’s Head," serving travellers on the main Canterbury to Deal road.

Mr Copestake said: “We have stayed all this time at the "Griffin’s Head" because we just fell in love with it.

"It is such a super old building in a beautiful location, with a great ambience. The fun of being a licensee is meeting people, and we have made so many amazing Mends here.”

The "Griffin’s Head" will remain open, and is being taken over this week by Helen Paraskevas, an experienced licensee who previously ran Shepherd Neame’s "Bucks Head" pub in Sevenoaks.

He said: “Karen and I will continue to live in the village, just down the road from the pub, so I expect that we will be popping in from time to time.

“We have absolutely loved our time at the "Griffin’s Head," and would like to thank all our hardworking staff and loyal customers for their support.”

Shepherd Neame chief executive Jonathan Neame said: “Jerry and Karen are a Shepherd Neame institution, and have done an amazing job at the "Griffin’s Head."

“We will be hosting a special farewell dinner for them at the brewery at the end of the month, and wish them a very happy retirement.”

From the Dover Express, 24 March, 2016.

Jerry and Karen pull their last pint at historic Griffin’s Head.

Griffin's Head locals 2016

FOND FAREWELL: Karen and Jerry (centre) with some of their former staff.

AFTER three decades behind the bar at the Griffin’s Head in Chillenden, licensee Jerry Copestake and wife Karen retired this week.

More than 500 customers and former staff flocked to the historic Shepherd Neame pub for a surprise send-off party on Sunday, March 13.

As an extra special surprise, Jerry and Karen’s 28-year-old son Nick flew over from his home in Canada to celebrate with his parents and older brother Mark.

The pub was decorated with photos of Jerry and Karen during the past 30 years and they were presented with a decanter and other gifts to mark the occasion.

Family.

Jerry, 70, said: “It was such a shock when I turned up at the pub and saw so many friends and family had gathered to celebrate with us. We had a brilliant time.”

Jerry first started his pub career in 1973, running the "Fox and Hounds" in Sevenoaks, then the "Plough" in Hildenborough, before joining Shepherd Neame in the early 1980s, running the "Woolpack" in Chilham then taking over the "Griffin’s Head" with Karen in 1986.

Built during the time of Edward I, the pub was a farmhouse until 1405. In 1766 it became the fully licensed "Griffin’s Head," serving travellers on the main Canterbury to Deal road. It still boasts many original features, including oak beams, flagstones and an inglenook fireplace.

Jerry said: “We have stayed all this time at the "Griffin's Head" because we just fell in love with it. It is such a super old building in a beautiful location, with a great ambience. The fun of being a licensee is meeting people and we have made so many amazing friends here.”

The "Griffin’s Head" will remain open, and is being taken over this week by Helen Paraskevas, an experienced licensee who previously ran Shepherd Neame’s "Bucks Head" pub in Sevenoaks.

Jerry said: “Karen and I will continue to live in the village, just down the road from the pub, so I expect that we will be popping in from time to time! We have absolutely loved our time at the "Griffin’s Head" and would like to thank all our hard-working staff and loyal customers for their support.”

 

From the Dover Mercury, 14 April, 2016.

New landlords at Griffin’s Head.

A husband and wife team have taken over a country pub after its previous licensees retired after 30 years.

Michael and Helen Paraskevas have moved into the Griffin’s Head in Chillenden, a Shepherd Neame pub which became a drinking hole in 1766. (sic. 1740-)

Michael and Helen Paraskevas

The Griffin's Head licensees, Michael and Helen Paraskevas

Its previous landlords Jerry Copestake and wife Karen decided to retire after three decades at the pub, which was originally a farmhouse built in 1405, during the reign of Edward I.

The pair were treated to a surprise send off last month by more than 500 customers, including many former staff and the couple’s son Nick, who flew over from Canada for the occasion.

Its new tenants are long-serving Shepherd Neame licensees, having run the brewery’s "Watermans Arms" in Wouldham for three years, then the "Bucks Head" in Sevenoaks (Godden Green) for 10 years.

Mrs Paraskevas, 57, said: “Jerry and Karen still live near by and have already been in to wish us well, which was lovely. The regulars have been incredibly welcoming, and our bar manager Ray Fulbrook, who has worked at the pub for 15 years, has really helped us settle in.

“We decided to have some time off after leaving the "Bucks Head," but my sister Carol and her husband Ralph took over the pub, so we were still in touch with Shepherd Neame, and heard that the "Griffin’s Head" was available.

“We didn’t know the area at all, but when we saw the pub, we loved it. It is a such a beautiful, traditional building with so much character.”

Originally from Rochester, Mr and Mrs Paraskevas met while travelling in Greece, where his family ran a restaurant.

The couple married in 1981, and spent 25 years working in the restaurant, Helen looking after front-of-house and Michael working as a chef, before returning to the UK with their three children.

Mr Paraskevas, 60, said: “The Griffin’s Head is a very successful pub, and our aim is to ensure it retains its unique character while also making our own mark.

“The kitchen and outside barbecue area are both being refurbished, and we are introducing a new menu, featuring bar snacks and traditional pub classics, with a touch of Mediterranean influence in some dishes.”

Griffin's Head 2016

From the Dover Express, 14 April, 2016.

Husband and wife team aim to make their mark at historic pub.

A NEW husband and wife team have taken over the Griffin’s Head pub in Chillenden.

Licensees Michael and Helen Paraskevas moved into the Shepherd Neame pub following the retirement of Jerry Copestake and wife Karen, who ran the Griffin’s Head for 30 years.

Karen and Jerry Copestake

Karen and Jerry Copestake at the Griffin's head have retired after 30 years.

Michael and Helen are also long-serving Shepherd Neame licensees, having run the brewery’s Watermans Arms in Would-ham for three years, then the Bucks Head in Sevenoaks for 10 years.

Helen, 57, said: “Jerry and Karen still live nearby and have already been in to wish us well, which was lovely.

“The regulars have been incredibly welcoming, and our bar manager Ray Fulbrook, who has worked at the pub for 15 years, has really helped us settle in.”

Originally from Rochester, Helen met Michael while travelling in Greece, where his family ran a restaurant.

The couple married in 1981, and spent 25 years working together in the restaurant, Helen looking after front-of-house and Michael working as a chef, before returning to the UK with their three children.

Helen said: “We decided to have some time off after leaving the Bucks Head, but my sister Carol and her husband Ralph took over the pub, so we were still in touch with Shepherd Neame, and heard that the Griffin’s Head was going to be available.

“We didn’t know the area at all, but when we saw the pub, we loved it. It is a such a beautiful, traditional building with so much character.”

Built during the time of Edward I, the Griffin’s Head was originally a farmhouse until 1405, until 1766 when it became a fully licensed pub serving travellers on the main Canterbury to Deal road. It still boasts many original features, including oak beams, flagstones and an inglenook fireplace.

Michael, 60, said: “The Griffin’s Head is a very successful pub, and our aim is to ensure it retains its unique character and appeal, while also making our own mark. The kitchen and outside barbecue area are both being refurbished, and we are introducing a new menu, featuring bar snacks and traditional pub classics, with a touch of Mediterranean influence in some dishes.”

The pub is open from noon to 11pm, Monday to Sunday Food will be available from noon to 2pm and 6.30pm to 9pm, Tuesday to Saturday, and from noon to 2pm on Sunday and Monday.

 

From thehttps://www.kentonline.co.uk By Joe Wright, 17 March 2017

Fire at Griffin's Head pub in Chillenden near Canterbury tackled by four crews.

Firefighters tackled a blaze at an 18th century village pub.

Four engines were called to the chimney fire at the Griffin's Head in Chillenden, near Canterbury.

Emergency crews were alerted to the blaze at the Shepherd Neame pub shortly after midday.

Griffins head fire 2017

Firefighters at the scene of the pub blaze.

Flames were seen coming out of the chimney stack, which was accessed by crews using a height vehicle.

The fire was contained to the chimney and teams left the scene at around 1pm.

The timber-framed building was originally a farmhouse built in 1405 during the reign of Edward I.

 

From the https://www.kentlive.news By Lauren MacDougall, 6 November 2019.

Kent’s cosiest pubs with gorgeous log fires that will shield you from the cold.

These stunning pubs come with crackling fires, beautiful interiors and tasty food.

Is there anything better than curling up next a toasty log fire, pint in hand?

With the winter months drawing in and November predicted to be one of the coldest ever, knowing your local cosy pub with a gorgeous log fire is more important than ever.

Whether you're looking for a tipple after a brisk walk or just after a warm afternoon out, there's plenty of choice.

These stunning pubs come with crackling fires, beautiful interiors and tasty food.

Some of them even have more than one wood burner, so you won't be fighting for the coveted space in front of the flickering flames.

If you're looking for some inspiration, check out our list below.

The Griffin's Head.

Griffins Head inside 2019

The Griffin's Head, Chillenden.

Where : Griffin Hill, Chillenden, Canterbury CT3 1PS.

What : With its original oak beams, inglenook fireplaces and sprawling wild roses in the garden, the Griffin’s Head in Chillenden is the quintessential Kentish country pub.

Originally built as a farmhouse in 1286, it’s a place that wears centuries of history and heritage with pride - making it a special setting for dinner and drinks.

A fabulous a la carte dining experience awaits guests here, with freshly prepared, beautifully presented dishes served in two charming dining areas, and classic Kentish ales, wines, spirits and more available at the bar.

 

From an email received 13 June 2022.

Henry Chapman was either the father or stepfather of Isabel Camburn, (she was born  out of wedlock in Lenham as, Isabel Boorman, married William Thomas Blaxland Camburn a mariner of Whitstable). Isabel Camburn is my great-grandmother and, after the death at sea in 1894 of my great-grandfather  W. T. B. Camburn she married Stephen Thomas Sage, a brewery drayman in 1896.

Les Aldridge.

 

LICENSEE LIST

BAX Thomas 1740+ Wingham Ale Licences 1740

BROOKS Mrs Rose to Jan/1850 Dover Telegraph

PETTIT Sar John 1847-Oct/54 dec'd Bagshaw's Directory 1847

PETTIT Harriet Oct/1854+ Canterbury Journal

SPINNER William 1867+

GROOMBRIDGE Alfred T 1874-82+ (age 41 in 1881Census) Post Office Directory 1874Post Office Directory 1882

CHAPMAN Henry 1891+ (widower age 45 in 1891Census)

SOAMES Thomas 1899-1903+ Kelly's 1899Kelly's 1903 (and carrier)

FOX Robert William 1911-3/July/1913+ (age 45 in 1911Census) Post Office Directory 1913Dover Express

KILLOCK Arthur James 3/July/1913+ Dover Express

PAGE Alfred Joshua to Jun/1921 Dover Express

KELLY William Martin (James) Jun/1921-39+ (age 52 in 1939) Dover ExpressKelly's 1934

DAVIS Keith 1971-74+ Library archives 1974 Shepherd Neame

Last pub licensee had COPESTAKE Jerry 1985-Mar/2016

Last pub licensee had PARASKEVAS Helen Mar/2016+

BROWN Nick Turner 2022+

https://pubwiki.co.uk/GriffinsHead.shtml

 

Wingham Ale Licences 1740From Wingham Division Ale Licences 1740 Ref: KAO - QRLV 3/1

Bagshaw's Directory 1847From Bagshaw Directory 1847

Post Office Directory 1874From the Post Office Directory 1874

Post Office Directory 1882From the Post Office Directory 1882

Kelly's 1899From the Kelly's Directory 1899

Kelly's 1903From the Kelly's Directory 1903

Post Office Directory 1913From the Post Office Directory 1913

Kelly's 1934From the Kelly's Directory 1934

Library archives 1974Library archives 1974

Dover ExpressFrom the Dover Express

Dover TelegraphFrom the Dover Telegraph

CensusCensus

 

If anyone should have any further information, or indeed any pictures or photographs of the above licensed premises, please email:-

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