DOVER KENT ARCHIVES

Page Updated:- Thursday, 13 July, 2023.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Paul Skelton

Earliest 1828-

Red Lion

Open 2020+

Maidstone Road / The Square / Warren Street

Lenham

01622 858531

http://www.redlionlenham.co.uk/

https://whatpub.com/red-lion

Red Lion 1911

Above photo circa 1911, kindly sent by Rory Kehoe.

Red Lion 1912

Above postcard, circa 1912, kindly sent by Rory Kehoe.

Red Lion 1930

Above photo, circa 1930, with permission from Eric Hartland.

Red Lion

Above postcard, date unknown, kindly sent by Mark Jennings.

Red Lion 1931

Above postcard, circa 1931, kindly sent by Rory Kehoe.

Red Lion

Above postcard, date unknown, kindly sent by Ray Newman.

George Inn

Above postcard, date unknown.

Red Lion 1960

Above photo, 1960, with permission from Eric Hartland.

Red Lion 2011

Photo taken 16 January 2011 from http://www.flickr.com Jelltex.

Red Lion inside 2011

Photo taken 16 January 2011 from http://www.flickr.com Jelltex.

Red Lion sign 1992Red Lion sign 1995

Above signs, February 1995.

With thanks from Brian Curtis www.innsignsociety.com.

 

Maidstone Journal and Kentish Advertiser, Tuesday 14 November 1843.

Lenham Agricultural Association.

The annual ploughing match of this association took place on Friday last, in a field belonging to Mr. W. Powell of East Lenham. A list of the prizes described on the occasion will be found at our advertising columns.

The dinner took place at the "Lion Inn," Sir Edmunds Filnest, Bart., M.P. in the chair.

We very much regret being compelled to postpone our report of the proceedings, together with remarks, on the ploughing till our next.

 

Kentish Gazette, 19 March 1844.

DEATH.

March 11, at Lenhnm, Mrs, Judith Bigg, aged 60, widow of Mr. R. Bigg, many years landlord of the "Lion Inn," Lenham.

 

Canterbury Journal 15 March 1856.

Assizes, Nisi Prius Court, Tuesday, before Baron Alderson.

Wallis v Payne.

Mr. Lush, for the plaintiff, said the action was brought to recover damages for an assault. Plaintiff pleaded that defendant was in his house, and she desired to have some liquor, but, as he refused to serve her, and she declined to go, he put her out without any more force than was necessary.

Mary Ann Wallis, the plaintiff, wife of John Wallis, who keeps a public house at Folkestone, ("North Foreland") said:- The defendant keeps a public house in Warren Street, Lenham. ("Red Lion.") Defendant married her mother. On the 8th Nov., 1854, she went to defendant’s house to see her mother. A young woman, Mary Hughes, went with her. She called defendant by his name, and asked him if her mother was there. He said “She is in, I believe.” She went through the tap-room into the wash-house to find her. Defendant was sitting in the tap-room. She found her mother in the wash-house, and came back with her, and was going to the parlour, which was close to the tap-room, across a passage. When her mother and her were going into the parlour, defendant struck her in the chest and knocked her against the wall, and then hit her on the side of the head, and knocked in the side of her bonnet. She went into the parlour and sat down. He called her a vulgar name, and then he struck her while she was sitting, and said he would send for a constable to put her out, as she had no business there. She told him she came civilly, to see her mother. He said no such ---- “varmint” like her had any business there. She sent for her son, to protect her. He came to the house, and she left with him.

By Mr. Chambers: She went home then to Folkestone. Her son drove her to Ashford; thence she went by rail. Defendant would not allow her mother to give her anything, so she could not tell if her son had anything when he came. She had seen her mother that morning before, at her sister’s, and had been in her company for half an hour. She knew that defendant had kept her mother without food for three or four days. Some months after the marriage, in 1854, they began to quarrel. Had not said that she knew of that, and that she and her mother would do for Payne if it cost 1,000. Her husband applied to Mr. Minter, an attorney, as soon as she got home. She had only taken some coffee and bread and butter at her aunt’s, before she went to defendant’s house. Went into the bar parlour after defendant struck her. Don’t know if there was a gin cupboard there. They used to keep it standing on a bureau. Would swear she did not say “Mother, let’s have some gin.” After she was beat she asked her mother for something, when she brought some beer from the cellar. Defendant then put a bottle into the cupboard, and put his back against it. She said she would not be pushed out, as it was a public house. Did not call him a blackguard or a thief. She wore the same bonnet on her way home, in the train, and everybody looked at it. (Laughter) She had the bonnet with her. Did not call in a doctor. She did put her fist in defendant’s face, and say she wished she was a man, for his sake. After defendant told her to leave the house, he tried to move her by taking hold of her bonnet. He crushed her comb. Thought her mother was older than her husband.

Mary Hughes, residing at Wichling, stated that she went with plaintiff to defendant. Plaintiff said to him, in a civil sort of way “How d’ye do, Payne. Can I see my mother?” He said “I dare say you can.” On plaintiff’s return from the wash-house, defendant used very bad language, and struck her against the wall. No words had passed between them up to that time, but before he struck her he said “You are not a-going in there.” She went in, notwithstanding, and then he struck her – first in the chest, knocking her against the wall. He hit her on the head as she was sitting on the chair. He spat at her face. Her mother was crying. Payne’s daughter said “The old woman’s going to the cellar.”

By Mr. Chambers: Witness is the daughter of the aunt who keeps the beer-shop. The cross-examination consisted principally of what she had for dinner. Witness did not recollect. His Lordship then said it was evident she had had “something short.”

John Wallis, the son, said he was sent for to the defendant’s house. His mother appeared much frightened. She showed him marks on her bonnet by defendant spitting, and told him defendant had struck her. Witness asked why he did it, but he made no distinct reply. Did not think defendant was sober. Whilst he was there defendant kept his foot on a chair near a cupboard.

Mr. Chambers, in reply, said if a verdict were given for the plaintiff the family would have accomplished the ruin of the defendant as they had said they would, the whole family being leagued against him. The plaintiff was going to a closet to get some gin, and as defendant declined to let her have it she persisted, and he then pushed her.

Mr. Payne, the defendant, said he kept a beer-shop called “The Harrow”, near Lenham. The plaintiff came to his house on the day named. He asked her what business she had there, and plaintiff said “Now, mother, let’s have some gin.” He told her she had had too much already, as he thought she was tipsy. Plaintiff took an empty glass and gave it to her mother to get some gin. It was in the cupboard, and he put his back against it to keep her from it. They pushed him, and then the mother took a jug and went into the cellar. He did nothing when they pushed him. The mother brought up some ale, when plaintiff, his wife, and the witness Young drank it. He told them he wanted them to leave that room, as it was where he kept his spirits. She was sitting in a chair, and he tried to push her out, but could not, and he sent for the constable. He could not be found, so he sent for a policeman, but one did not come. He did not call her bad names. She shook her fist in his face, and said she would do for him. He did not spit in her face. They went away before the man he had sent for a policeman came back. He did not speak to her roughly. The first time he struck her was after they went into the cellar. The cupboard had no lock on it.

Kate Payne, daughter of defendant, said she saw Mrs. Wallis with a jug, going to the cellar. Plaintiff knocked her arm down on a desk and said “If it costs me a thousand pounds I’ll do for you.” Her father put his back against a door. She said “I wish I was a man for your sake.” He desired her to leave the room, saying it was where he kept his cashbox. Her mother-in-law left the house on the same day this occurred, and had not been heard of since.

The jury consulted for a short time, and it was announced by the foreman that they were not agreed – they were eleven to one.

His Lordship: That won’t do. You must be twelve to nothing.

The foreman turned round, and in a moment returned a verdict for the defendant.

 

Maidstone Journal 18 March 1856.

Assizes, Tuesday, Nisi Prius Court: Before Baron Alderson.

Wallis v Payne.

Mr. Lush, for the plaintiff, said the action was brought to recover damages for an assault. Plaintiff pleaded that defendant was in his house, and she desired to have some liquor, but, as he refused to serve her, and she declined to go, he put her out without any more force than was necessary.

Mary Ann Wallis, the plaintiff, wife of John Wallis, who keeps a public house at Folkestone, said:- Defendant keeps a public house in Warren Street, Lenham. Defendant married her mother. On the 8th Nov., 1854, she went to defendant’s house to see her mother. A young woman, Mary Hughes, went with her. She called defendant by his name, and asked him if her mother was there. He said “She is in, I believe.” She went through the tap-room into the wash-house to find her. Defendant was sitting in the tap-room. She found her mother in the wash-house, and came back with her, and was going to the parlour, which was close to the tap-room, across the passage. When her mother and her were going into the parlour, defendant struck her in the chest and knocked her against the wall, and then hit her on the side of the head, and knocked in the side of her bonnet. She went into the parlour and sat down. He called her a vulgar ----. He struck her while she was sitting, and said he would send for a constable to put her out, as she had no business there. She told him she came civilly, to see her mother. He said “No such ---- “varmint” like her had any business there.” She sent for her son, to protect her. He came to the house, and she left with him.

By Mr. Chambers: She went home then to Folkestone. Her son drove her to Ashford; thence she went by rail. Defendant would not allow her mother to give her anything, so she could not tell if her son had anything when he came. She had seen her mother that morning before, at her sister’s, and had been in her company for half an hour. She knew that defendant had kept her mother without food for three or four days. Some months after the marriage, in 1854, they began to quarrel. Had not said that she knew of that, and that she and her mother would do for Payne if it cost 1,000 – never had said so. Her husband applied to Mr. Minter, attorney, as soon as she got home. She had only taken some coffee and bread and butter before she went to defendant’s house. Went into the bar parlour after defendant struck her. Don’t know if there was a gin cupboard there. They used to keep it standing on a bureau. Would swear she did not say “Mother, let’s have some gin.” After she was beat, asked her mother for something, when her mother brought some beer from the cellar. Defendant then put a bottle into the cupboard, and put his back against it. She said she would not be pushed out, as it was a public house. Did not call him a blackguard or a thief. She wore the same bonnet on her way home, in the train, and everybody looked at it. (Laughter) She had the bonnet with her. Did not call in a doctor. She did put her fist in defendant’s face, and say she wished she was a man, for his sake. After defendant told her to leave the house, he tried to move her by taking hold of her bonnet. He crushed her comb. Thought her mother was older than her husband.

Mary Hughes, residing at Wichling, stated that she went with plaintiff to defendant. Plaintiff said to him, in a civil sort of way “How d’ye do, Payne. Can I see my mother?” He said “I dare say you can.” On plaintiff’s return from the wash-house, defendant used very bad language, and struck her against the wall. No words had passed between them up to that time, but before he struck her he said “You are not a-going in there.” She went in, notwithstanding, and then he struck her – first in the chest, knocking her against the wall. He hit her on the head as she was sitting on the chair. He spat at her face. Her mother was crying. Payne’s daughter said “The old woman’s going to the cellar.”

By Mr. Chambers: Witness is the daughter of the aunt who keeps the beer-shop. The cross-examination consisted principally of what she had for dinner. Witness did not recollect. His Lordship then said it was evident she had had “something short.”

John Wallis, the son, said he did not go to the defendant’s house. His mother appeared much frightened. She showed him marks on her bonnet by defendant spitting, and told him defendant had struck her. Witness asked why he did it, but he made no distinct reply. Did not think defendant was sober. Whilst he was there defendant kept his foot on a chair near a cupboard.

Mr. Chambers, in reply, said if a verdict were given for the plaintiff the family would have accomplished the ruin of the defendant as they had said they would - the whole family being leagued against him. The plaintiff was going to a closet to get some gin, and as defendant declined to let her have it she persisted, and he then pushed her.

Mr. Payne, the defendant, said he kept a beer-shop called “The Harrow”, near Lenham. The plaintiff came to his house on the day named. He asked her what business she had there, and plaintiff said “Now, mother, let’s have some gin.” He told her she had had too much already, as he thought she was tipsy. Plaintiff took an empty glass and gave it to her mother to get some gin. It was in the cupboard, and he put his back against it to keep her from it. They pushed him, and then the mother took a mug and went into the cellar. He did nothing when they pushed him. The mother brought up some ale, when plaintiff, his wife, and the witness Young drank it. He told them he wanted them to leave that room, as it was where he kept his spirits. She was sitting in a chair, and he tried to pull her out, but could not, and he sent for the constable. He could not be found, so he sent for a policeman, but one did not come. He did not call her bad names. She shook her fist in his face, and said she would do for him. He did not spit in her face. They went away before the man he had sent for a policeman came back. He did not speak to her roughly. The first time he struck her was after they went into the cellar. The cupboard had no lock on it.

Kate Payne, daughter of defendant, said she saw Mrs. Wallis with a jug, going to the cellar. Plaintiff knocked her arm down on a desk and said “If it costs me a thousand pounds I’ll do for you.” Her father put his back against a door. She said “I wish I was a man for your sake.” He desired her to leave the room, saying it was where he kept his cashbox. Her mother-in-law left the house on the same day this occurred, and had not been heard of since.

This was the whole of the evidence.

The jury consulted for a short time, and it was announced by the foreman that they were not agreed – they were eleven to one.

His Lordship: That won’t do. You must be twelve to nothing.

The foreman turned round, and in a moment returned a verdict for the defendant.

 

Maidstone Journal and Kentish Advertiser 6 August 1859.

BEARSTED PETTY SESSIONS.

John Potter, beerhouse-keeper, Lenham, was charged with wilfully breaking two squares of glass, the property of Mr. Payne, "Lion Inn," on the 7th July. - Ordered to pay the damage, 2s., and costs, 17s.

 

 

LICENSEE LIST

BIGG Richard 1828-44+ (Pigot's Directory 1828-29 "Lion")Pigot's Directory 1832-34

PAYNE Thomas 1851-82+ (also farmer age 53 in 1871Census)

CHAMBERS George 1891-1922+ (age 50 in 1891Census) Kelly's 1903

https://pubwiki.co.uk/RedLion.shtml

 

Pigot's Directory 1828-29From the Pigot's Directory 1828-29

Pigot's Directory 1832-34From the Pigot's Directory 1832-33-34

CensusCensus

Kelly's 1903From the Kelly's Directory 1903

 

If anyone should have any further information, or indeed any pictures or photographs of the above licensed premises, please email:-

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