DOVER KENT ARCHIVES

Page Updated:- Thursday, 15 September, 2022.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Paul Skelton

Earliest 1750-

Star

Latest 1978

Cheriton Road

Newington

Star painting 1857

 Above showing an oil on canvas painting of the original pub, painted in 1857 by local artist John James Wilson (1818-75).

Star Inn, Newington

Above photo date unknown.

Above showing the approximate location in 2011.

Star sign

Above aluminium card issued June 1951. Sign series 3 number 34.

 

Built in 1710 and first mentioned as the "Star" in 1750, unfortunately demolished in 1978 to make way for the M20 and Channel Tunnel.

At one time a pony and trap business operated from their stables housed at the rear of the pub.

The premises used to have a huge painted wall inside showing the inside on an inn with coach and horses tethered outside the doorway. The story goes that a passing traveller painted it in exchange for board and lodgings.

Star Inn painting

The above picture shows the painting as the building was being demolished.

 

Kentish Gazette 21 October 1848.

East Kent Sessions.

The Michaelmas session was held at St. Augustine's on Friday, before J. B. Wildman, Esq. (chairman), and other magistrates, among whom were: Sir Brook W. Bridges, Bart., the Hon. H. S. Law, J. P. Plutnptre, Esq., M.P., J, Godfrey, Esq., G. Gipps, Esq., E. Foss, Esq., G. M. Taswcll, Esq., W. C. Fairman, Esq., W. Delmar, Esq., M. Bell, Esq., E. N. H. D’Aeth, Esq., Rev. J. Hilton, &c.

Thomas Cooke, alias Stickals, 44, John Stroud, 42, George Marshal, 32, and Henry King, 51, charged with having, on the 3rd of August, stolen nine quarters of malt, value £30, the property of Thomas Higden, of Newington, next Hythe. The prisoners, who had been committed to Maidstone gaol, had been brought thence for trial. A great number of witnesses had been subpoenaed. The extent to which robberies of this description have been carried, increased the degree of interest generally felt, the more especially as most of the parties were well known, two of them having formerly kept beer-shops at Canterbury, and one of the others being a market-gardener of Littlebourne, who was always thought to be an industrious and honest man.

Messrs. Horn and Tassell were for the prosecution, and Messrs. Rose and Russell for the defence.

Mr. Horn, in opening the case for the prosecution, observed that it was not necessary in order to convict all the prisoners, that they should have been bodily engaged in stealing the malt. It was sufficient if they were found so near, as to be enabled to assist in it. It was necessary to bring home the guilt of the actual thieves, before others could be charged with aiding and abetting. Cooke and Marshall resided at Canterbury; Stroud at Littlebourne, and King at Ramsgate. On the morning previous to the robbery, as he would show, Cooke, King, and Marshall, were together at the Chance public-house, in Canterbury. In the afternoon of the same day, two, if not three, of them, were at the White Lion, in the same place; and on the evening prior to the rubbery, about half-past eight o’clock, one of them, King, and another person, were together at Elmsted, having with them a horse and cart, which had been hired of a person in Canterbury. The prisoners had two horses and carts with them on the occasion of the robbery, one of them belonging to Stroud. The learned counsel produced a plan of the premises, to show the situation in which the prisoners were seen, especially Marshall, to lead to the inference that he was aiding and abetting in the removal of the stolen property; and after detailing a variety of particulars connected with the concert of the prisoners, together with their arrest, proceeded to call the following witnesses:-

J. B. Horn, assistant to Mr. Messenger, architect, of Folkestone, was examined as to the correctness of the plan produced, as regarded distances.

H. Rigden, maltman to prosecutor, deposed that on Wednesday, the 2nd of August, he left the malt-house locked and barred. There were forty or fifty quarters of malt in bin, but none in sack. Next morning found nineteen sacks, not belonging to his master, filled with malt.

John Attwood, landlord of the Chance, at Canterbury, knew the prisoners; Cooke, Marshall, and King, were at his house on the 2nd of August, between ten and eleven o’clock; Cooke and Marshall lived at Canterbury, -Stroud at Littlebourne, and King at Ramsgate. King met with an accident at his house on the previous Tuesday night, by which he was marked across the nose, and be put on a brown patch, which he had on the Wednesday.

Thomas Taylor, landlord of the White Lion, Canterbury, knew the prisoners Cooke, Stroud, and Marshall, and spoke positively of the former two being at his house in the afternoon of the 2nd August; he could not state so positively in respect of the last mentioned, though a man came in with a patch on his nose, but he believed that he did not communicate with the others.

Cross examined: Never, to his knowledge, before saw King, and, therefore, was not able to say that he was the one who came with the patch on his nose.

Benjamin Barnes, licensed to let horses at Canterbury, remembered the prisoner Cooke hiring of him a bay horse, in the afternoon of the 2nd of August, for the purpose, as be stated, of going about six miles into the country. The horse not being returned, he made inquiry, and found it at prosecutor's house a week after.

Thomas Philpot, a boy in the employ of Mr. Church, at the George, at Elmsted, deposed to two men coining to the George with a bay horse, about half-past eight, on the day in question, one of them having a patch on his nose. He pointed out the prisoner King as one of the men, and who bore the patch; he believed Cooke was the other. They came from Canterbury, and told Mr. Church they were going to Hythe, in which direction they went. They wore white coats or gaberdines, like those produced, though he was not quite sure, and did not stay long.

Cross-examined: Could not recollect, when before the magistrates, whether they were gaberdines or coats worn by the men.

Re-examined: Only King was before the magistrate; had not seen Cooke since that night.

James Fisher, shepherd to T. Rigden, of Cheriton, was at the Star, at Newington, on the 2nd of August; had been to a cricket match, and on leaving the Star saw two carts with horses standing by the side of the road, about one hundred yards from the Star. A man, who was with them, asked if the people were all gone from the Star, which raised his suspicion, and he proceeded to Longport Farm, about one hundred and fifty yards from the Star, and there saw Sawkins, who agreed to watch with him (witness). Witness then proceeded towards the malt-house which was about a quarter of a mile from the Star. Hearing a noise as he thought within the malt-house, or outside, he proceeded to the gate near the malt-house, and saw a man come from it with a sack on his back. He rushed towards the man who dropped the sack and ran away towards Mr. Dunn’s stack-yard; after that he saw another man, whom he pointed out to be Stroud, come out of the malt-house with another sack on his back. Witness collared him, and threw him down, on which another man came up and threatened him, with a violent expression, if he (witness) did not let his mate go. A third also struck him two blows. Witness did not let the one go of whom he had hold, but called loudly for assistance. They scuffled ‘til they got into the river, where witness held him (the prisoner Stroud) full twenty minutes till assistance was rendered by Mr. Dunn, and then they took the prisoner to the Star, and delivered him into the hands of Rye.

Cross-examined: Saw some man with the carts as soon as he (witness) left the Star; it was a light night; did not see the man who ran away go into Dunn's stack-yard.

James Dunn, farmer at Newington, who was also at the Star on the night in question, deposed to seeing the two horses and carts standing by the side of the road, which excited his suspicions, and be went back and asked him for whom he was waiting; he replied his “governor.” Witness returned to the Star, but on hearing a hallooing went towards the malt-house, when he met two of the party who had been at the Star with a man who was stated to be King. On reaching the malt-house he found Fisher and Stroud in the river. Witness helped them out, and went to Mr. Rigden’s. On going to his father’s stack-yard he found a man, who proved to be Cooke, behind a wheatstack. He spoke to him three times but received no answer; on which witness collared him, who in return kicked him (witness). Witness threw him down, and with the aid of others gave him into Rye’s custody. Witness, with others, afterwards secured Marshall, who was standing by the side of the horses and carts. Next morning witness found a bundle of clothes, consisting of two coats, in a field adjoining the road where the carts stood. Witness also took the other coats produced out of the carts.

Cross-examined: Witness was of the cricketing party, but had not drunk more than to excite him a little.

John Oldham, carpenter, of Newington, who was one of the party at the Star on the day aforementioned, corroborated the evidence as to seeing Marshall with the horses and carts, and asking him if he had got a waiting job; to which he replied in the affirmative, and stated that the party was at the Star. On that witness repaired again to the Star, and finding that there was no one there for whom he could be waiting, returned towards the cart with the last witness, in doing which he heard a hallooing in the direction of the malt-house, and met King, who was walking very fast towards Folkestone, and was out of breath. In reply to a question from witness, he said he was going to Hythe, but witness told him he was in the wrong direction; and on his walking fast, witness bade him not to walk so fast, as be heard a hallooing, which he supposed the prisoner did also; but he said he did not, as he was deaf. On witness collaring him, he said he was in a hurry and wanted to get off. He replied in answer to a question by another person that he knew nothing of either Marshall or the carts; and, after detaining him twenty minutes, witness let him go again. He had no doubt of the prisoner King being the same man. Witness on a subsequent day, the 14th of August, went to Ramsgate, and there identified King as the man whom he had seen in the road. In reply to a question whether or not he knew anything of the malt robbery, he replied in the negative; and Kemp then took him into custody. Had a good opportunity of seeing King when detaining him on the 2nd of August; he had a patch on his nose. When taking him the second time he had a scar on his nose, at the same place where the patch had been.

George Rigden, son of prosecutor, who was at the Star on the evening in question, corroborated the evidence as to seeing Marshall in the way described, by the side of the road and the conversation that took place with him, as to its being suspicious that he was there with the carts and hearing the hallooing; together with King's coming up, with a brown patch on his nose, and his subsequent arrest at Ramsgate. He spoke positively as to the identity of King, being the same man who was met on the road.

Cross-examined: King had a mark on his nose when apprehended at Ramsgate; that was a part of his reason for believing him to be the same person who had been met on the road; beside which a lantern was held up to his face when on the road.

Thomas Kemp, constable at Hythe, who went with the last two witnesses to Ramsgate on the 14th of August, corroborated their testimony. On taking Cooke, Stroud and Marshall to Maidstone, Cooke said they had thrown some garments over the hedge. King did not appear deaf when apprehended.

James Rye, constable at Newington, received into his custody, on the night in question, Cooke, Stroud, and Marshall. Picked up a pot near the Star door, when Cooke said “It appears someone was going to serve that pet as we were going to serve the malt.” Found a box of Lucifer matches on Cooke.

Cross-examined: Was quite sure the expression was what he had stated, and that Cooke used the word “we,’’ and not “they.”

Thos. Rigden, the prosecutor, deposed to the malt in the malt-house being his property. Had seen the notices put in, sent to Mr. Delasaux on the behalf of Cook and Stroud, claiming the two carts and one horse which were in his (witness’s) possession, being those which were taken on the night in question. On one of the carts were the words “John Stroud, fruiterer, Littlebourne.” The horse and carts were still in his (witness's) possession. (The notices were then read threatening the prosecutor with actions of trover if the horse and carts were not given up).

Cross-examined: Was ordered by the committing magistrate to detain the horse and carts.

Henry Rigden, son off the prosecutor, who went to the malt house after seeing the prisoners safely lodged at the Star, found the door unlocked, two sacks filled with malt outside, and seventeen others filled inside. One of them bore the name “Collard, Hoath Mill, 45,” and the other ”J. Sharpe, Canterbury.’’ None of the sacks belonged to his father.

Mr. Rose objected to this evidence relating to the sacks when none were produced.

Examination continued: Found a dark lantern in the malt-house and a cap outside. There were about nineteen and a half quarters of malt in the sacks, the value being about £30.

Mr. Rose, in defence, did not attempt to dispute the evidence as regarded Stroud; but submitted there was not sufficient to convict either of the other three. In respect of King that there was not sufficient identity, and that as regarded Cook it was inexplicable how, if he had been concerned in the robbery, he should have remained so long in the stack-yard, as was alleged, after the man having been seen go thither, and his being taken out. In reference to Marshall also, he contended that he was not found to have been sufficiently near to render assistance as he was above a quarter of a mile from the place whence the malt was taken. The learned counsel then called two witnesses to speak to Stroud's previous good character.

The Chairman, in summing up, directed especial attention to Cooke’s expression on being taken to the Star as sufficient proof of his guilt; that King was amply identified, beside which he was seen running very much out of breath in the opposite direction whence the call for help came; and he directed attention to the account he gave of himself when accosted as to where he was going, and his pretence of deafness when there wasno proof of it. As regarded Marshall there could be no doubt that he was in the road with the horses and carts, with the view of rendering assistance in the removal of the malt, which he substantiated by reading the law on the question, pointing out that if a man watched at a convenient distance for the purpose of preventing surprise to his companions and to favour their escape, or if necessary to come to their assistance, the knowledge of which was calculated to give them additional confidence, he was present aiding and abetting.

The jury, after a very brief consultation, returned a verdict of Guilty against all the prisoners.

The Chairman expressed his perfect concurrence in the verdict; and in passing sentence, said it was with great pain he addressed the prisoners, as the crime of which they had been guilty was one of a most serious nature, which they had evidently conducted in a way that proved to the Court they had made it their business, and that it was by no means the first attempt they had made in such a course. The planning of the robbery and the manner in which it had altogether been conducted convinced the Court that the prisoners were old offenders in the crime of which they stood convicted. It was absolutely necessary that the desperate attempts which were continually made in this way, on the property of the country should be put a stop to; and he knew of no other way in which that could be, but by making a most serious example of those cases which, like this, were brought home. The sentence which he was directed by the Court to pass was, that each of them be transported beyond the seas to the place which her Majesty should think fit, for the term of ten years.

The severity of this sentence produced a great sensation in Court. The culprits bad scarcely left the dock before they were re-called, when the Chairman stated that he had been in error, in thinking that he could not pass a lighter sentence than ten years’ transportation. Having been set right, be was directed to sentence the prisoners severally to be transported seven years. This, sorrowful as it was, came ns some relief to the convicts, who, in the moment or two that had elapsed since the first passing of the sentence, had suffered something, as their countenances indicated.

The trial lasted nearly four hours.

 

Canterbury Journal 21 October 1848.

East Kent Quarter Sessions, St. Augustines, yesterday, before J.B. Wildman Esq.

Thomas Cook, alias Stickals, 44, John Stroud, 42, George Marshall, 32, and Henry King, 51, charged with having, on the 3rd August, stolen nine quarters of malt, value £30, the property of Thomas Rigden, of Newington, next Hythe.

The prisoners, who had been committed to Maidstone gaol, had been brought thence for trial. A great number of witnesses had been subpoenaed. The extent to which robberies of this description had been carried increased the degree of interest felt in the town, the more especially as most of the parties were well-known, two of them having formerly kept beer shops here, and one of the others being a market gardener of Littlebourne, who was always thought to be an industrious and honest man.

Messrs. Horn and Tassell were for the prosecution, and Messrs. Rose and Russell for the defence.

Mr. Horn, in opening the case for the prosecution, observed that it was not necessary, in order to convict all the prisoners, that they should have been bodily engaged in stealing the malt. It was sufficient if they were found so near as to be able to assist in it. It was necessary to bring home the guilt of the actual thieves, before others could be charged with aiding and abetting. Cook and Marshall resided at Canterbury; Stroud at Littlebourne; and King at Ramsgate. On the morning previous to the robbery, as he would show, Cook, King and Marshall were together at the "Chance" public house in Canterbury. In the afternoon of the same day, two, if not three of them, were at the "White Lion" in the same place; and on the evening prior to the robbery, about half past eight o'clock, King and another person were together at Elmsted, having with them a horse and cart, which had been hired of a person in Canterbury. The prisoners had two horses and carts with them on the occasion of the robbery, one of them belonging to Stroud. The learned counsel produced a plan of the premises, to show the situation in which the prisoners were seen, especially Marshall, to lead to the inference that he was aiding and abetting in the removal of the stolen property; and after detailing a variety of particulars connected with the concert of the prisoners, together with their arrest, proceeded to call the following witnesses:

J.B. Horn, assistant to Mr. Messenger, architect, of Folkestone, was examined merely as to the correctness of the plan produced, as regarded distances.

H. Rigden, maltman to prosecutor, deposed that on Wednesday, the 2nd of August, he left the malthouse locked and barred. There were forty or fifty quarters of malt in bin, but none in sack. Next morning he found nineteen sacks, not belonging to his master, filled with malt.

Jno. Attwood, landlord of the "Chance," at Canterbury, knew the prisoners; Cook, Marshall and King were at his house on the 2nd August between ten and eleven o'clock; Cook and Marshall lived at Canterbury, Stroud at Littlebourne, and King at Ramsgate. King met with an accident at his house on the previous Tuesday night, by which he was marked across the nose, and he put on a brown patch, which he had on the Wednesday.

Thomas Taylor, landlord of the "White Lion," Canterbury, knew the prisoners Cook, Stroud and Marshall, and spoke positively of the former two being at his house on the afternoon of the 2nd August; he could not state so positively in respect of the last mentioned, though a man came in with a patch on his nose, but he believed that he did not communicate with the others.

Cross-ezamined: Never, to his knowledge, before saw King, and, therefore, was not able to say that he was the one who came with the patch on his nose.

Benj. Barnes, licensed to let horses at Canterbury, remembered the prisoner Cook hiring of him a bay horse in the afternoon of the 2nd August, for the purpose, as he stated, of going about six miles into the country. The horse not being returned, he made inquiry, and found it at prosecutor's house a week after.

Thos. Philpot, a boy in the employ of Mr. Church, at the "George," at Elmsted, (Stelling Minnis) deposed to two men coming to the "George" with a bay horse, about half past eight on the day in question, one of them having a patch on his nose. He pointed out the prisoner King as one of the men, who bore the patch; he believed Cook was the other. They came from Canterbury, and told Mr. Church they were going to Hythe, in which direction they went. They wore white coats, or gaberdines, like those produced, though he was not quite sure; and did not stay long.

Cross-examined: Could not recollect, when before the magistrate, whether they were gaberdines or coats worn by the men.

Re-examined: Only King was before the magistrate; had not seen Cook since that night.

James Fisher, shepherd to T. Rigden, of Cheriton, was at the "Star," at Newington, on the 2nd August; had been to a cricket match, and on leaving the "Star" saw two carts with horses standing by the side of the road, about 100 yards from the "Star." A man, who was with them, asked if the people were all gone from the "Star," which raised his suspicion, and he proceeded to Longport Farm, about 150 yards from the "Star," and there saw Sawkins, who agreed to watch with him (witness). Witness then proceeded towards the malthouse which was about a quarter of a mile from the Star. Hearing a noise, as he thought, within the malthouse or outside, he proceeded to the gate near the malthouse, and saw a man come from it with a sack on his back. He rushed towards the man, who dropped the sack and ran away to Mr. Dunn's stack-yard; after that he saw another man, whom he pointed out to be Stroud, come out of the malthouse with another sack on his back. Witness collared him and threw him down, on which another man came up and threatened him with a violent expression if he (witness) did not let his mate go. A third also struck him two blows. Witness did not let the one go of whom he had hold, but called loudly for assistance. They scuffled till they got into the river, where witness held him (the prisoner Stroud) full twenty minutes till assistance was rendered by Mr. Dunn, and then they took the prisoner to the "Star," and delivered him into the hands of Rye, the constable. On their way thither they saw Marshall on the road with two horses and carts, at the place where he first saw him. He took him also into custody and delivered him into the hands of Rye.

Cross-examined: Saw some man with the carts as soon as he (witness) left the "Star;" it was a light night; did not see the man who ran away go into Mr. Dunn's stack-yard.

James Dunn, farmer at Newington, who was also at the "Star" on the night in question, deposed to seeing the two horses and carts standing by the side of the road, which excited his suspicions, and he went back and asked him for whom he was waiting; he replied his “governor”. Witness returned to the "Star," but on hearing a hallooing went towards the malthouse, when he met two of the party who had been at the "Star," with a man who was stated to be King. On reaching the malthouse he found Fisher and Stroud in the river. Witness helped them out and went to Mr. Rigden's. On going to his father's stack-yard he found a man, who proved to be Cook, behind a wheat stack. He spoke to him three times but received no answer, on which witness collared him, who in return kicked him (witness). Witness threw him down, and with the aid of others gave him into Rye's custody. Witness, with others, afterwards secured Marshall, who was standing by the side of the horses and carts. Next morning witness found a bundle of clothes, consisting of two coats, in a field adjoining the road where the carts stood. Witness also took the other coats produced out of the carts.

Cross-examined: Witness was of the cricketing party, but had not drunk more than to excite him a little.

John Oldham, carpenter of Newington, who was one of the party at the "Star" on the day aforementioned, corroborated the evidence as to seeing Marshall with the horses and carts, and asked him if he had got a waiting job, to which he replied in the affirmative, and stated that the party was at the "Star." On that witness repaired again to the Star, and finding that there was no-one there for whom he could be waiting, returned towards the cart with the last witness, in doing which he heard a hallooing in the direction of the malthouse, and met King, who was walking very fast towards Folkestone, and was out of breath. In reply to a question from witness he said he was going to Hythe, but witness told him he was in the wrong direction; and on his walking fast, witness bade him not to walk so fast, as he heard a hallooing, which he supposed the prisoner did also, but he said he did not, as he was deaf. On witness collaring him he said he was in a hurry, and wanted to get off. He replied in answer to a question by another person that he knew nothing of Marshall of the carts; and on detaining him twenty minutes, witness let him go again. He had no doubt of the prisoner King being the same man. Witness on a subsequent day, the 14th Aug., went to Ramsgate, and there identified King as the man whom he had seen in the road. In reply to a question whether or not he knew anything of the malt robbery, he replied in the negative, and Kemp then took him into custody. He had a good opportunity of seeing King when detaining him on the 2nd Aug.; he had a patch on his nose. When taking him the second time he had a scar on his nose at the same place where the patch had been.

George Rigden, son of prosecutor, who was at the "Star" on the evening in question, corroborated the evidence as to seeing Marshall in the way described, by the side of the road and the conversation that took place with him, as to its being suspicious that he was there with the carts and hearing the hallooing; together with King's coming up, with a brown patch on his nose, and his subsequent arrest at Ramsgate. He spoke positively as to the identity of King being the same man who was met on the road.

Cross-examined: King had a mark on his nose when apprehended at Ramsgate; that was a part of his reason for believing him to be the same person he had met on the road, beside which a lantern was held up to his face when on the road.

Thos. Kemp, constable at Hythe, who went with the last two witnesses to Ramsgate on the 14th of August, corroborated their testimony. On taking Cook, Stroud and Marshall to Maidstone, Cook said they had thrown some garments over the hedge. King did not appear deaf when apprehended.

James Rye, constable at Newington, received into his custody on the night in question Cook, Stroud and Marshall. Picked up a pot near the "Star" door, when Cook said “It appears someone was going to serve that pot as we were going to serve the malt”. Found a box of Lucifer matches on Cook.

Cross-examined: Was quite sure the expression was what he had stated, and that Cook used the word “we” and not “they”.

Thos. Rigden, the prosecutor, deposed to the malt in the malthouse being his property. Had seen the notices put in, sent by Mr. Delasaux on the behalf of Cook and Stroud, claiming the two carts and one horse which were in his (witness's) possession, being those which were taken on the night in question. On one of the carts were the words “John Stroud, fruiterer, Littlebourne”. The horse and carts were still in his (witness's) possession. (The notices were then read threatening the prosecutor with actions of trover if the horse and carts were not given up.)

Cross-examined: Was ordered by the committing magistrate to detain the horse and carts.

Henry Rigden, son of the prosecutor, who went to the malthouse after seeing the prisoners safely lodged at the "Star," found the door unlocked, two sacks filled with malt outside, and seventeen others filled inside. One of them bore the name “Collard, Hoath Mill, 45”, and the other “J. Sharpe, Canterbury”. None of the sacks belonged to his father.

Mr. Rose objected to this evidence relating to the sacks when none were produced.

Examination continued: Found a dark lantern in the malthouse, and a cap outside. There were about nineteen and a half quarters of malt in the sacks, the value being about £30.

Mr. Rose, in defence, did not attempt to dispute the evidence as regarded Stroud, but submitted there was not sufficient to convict either of the other three; in respect of King that there was not sufficient identity, and that as regarded Cook it was inexplicable how, if he had been concerned in the robbery, he should have remained so long in the stack-yard, as was alleged, after the man having been seen go thither, and his being taken out. In reference to Marshall also, Mr. R. contended that he was not found to have been sufficiently near to render assistance as he was above a quarter of a mile from the place whence the malt was taken. The learned counsel then called two witnesses to speak to Stroud's previous good character.

The Chairman, in summing up, directed especial attention to Cook's expression on being taken to the "Star" as sufficient proof of his guilt; that King was amply identified, beside which he was running very much out of breath in the opposite direction whence the call for help came; and he directed attention to the account he gave of himself when accosted as to where he was going, and his pretence of deafness when there was no proof of it. As regarded Marshall there was no doubt that he was in the road with the horses and carts, with the view of rendering assistance on the removal of the malt, which he substantiated by reading the law on the question, pointing out that if a man watched at a convenient distance for the purpose of preventing surprise to his companions and to favour their escape, or if necessary to come to their assistance, the knowledge of which was calculated to give them additional confidence, he was present aiding and abetting.

The jury, after a very brief consultation, returned a verdict of Guilty against all the prisoners.

The Chairman expressed his perfect concurrence with the verdict, and in passing sentence said it was with great pain he addressed the prisoners, as the crime of which they had been found guilty was one of a most serious nature, which they had evidently conducted in a way that proved to the Court they had made it their business, and that it was by no means the first attempt they had made in such a course. The planning of the robbery and the manner in which it had altogether been conducted convinced the Court that the prisoners were old offenders in the crime of which they stood convicted. It was absolutely that the desperate attempts which were continually made in this way on the property of the country should be put a stop to, and he knew of no other way in which that could be but by making a most serious example of those cases which, like this, were brought home. The sentence that he was directed by the Court to pass was that each of them be transported beyond the seas to the place which Her Majesty should think fit, for the term of ten years.

The severity of this sentence produced a great sensation in Court. The culprits had scarcely left the dock before they were recalled, when the Chairman stated that he had been in error in thinking that he could not pass a lighter sentence than ten years' transportation. Having been set right, he was directed to sentence the prisoners severally to be transported seven years. This, sorrowful as it was, came as some relief to the convicts, who, in the moment or two that had elapsed since the first passing of the sentence had suffered something, as their countenances indicated.

The trial lasted nearly four hours.

 

From the Kentish Gazette, 24 October 1848.

THE MALT ROBBERY.

Thomas Cooke, alias Stickals, 44, John Stroud, 42, George Marshal, 32, and Henry King, 51, charged with having, on the 3rd of August, stolen nine quarters of malt, value £30., the property of Thomas Rigden, of Newington, next Hythe. The prisoners, who had been committed to Maidstone gaol, had been brought thence for trial. A great number of witnesses had been subpoenaed. The extent to which robberies of this description have been carried, increased the degree of interest generally felt, the more especially as most of the parties were well known, two of them having formerly kept beer-shops at Canterbury, and one of the others being a market-gardener of Littlebourne, who was always thought to be an industrious and honest man.

Messrs. Horn and Tassell were for the prosecution, and Messrs. Rose and Russell for the defence.

Mr. Horn, in opening the case for the prosecution, observed that it was not necessary in order to convict all the prisoners, that they should have been bodily engaged in stealing the malt. It was sufficient if they were found so near, as to be enabled to assist in it. It was necessary to bring home the guilt of the actual thieves, before others could be charged with aiding and abetting. Cooke and Marshall resided at Canterbury; Stroud at Littlebourne, and King at Ramsgate. On the morning previous to the robbery, as he would show, Cooke, King, and Marshall, were together at the "Chance" public-house, in Canterbury. In the afternoon of the same day, two, if not three, of them, were at the "White Lion," in the same place; and on the evening prior to the robbery, about half-past eight o'clock, one of them, King, and another person, were together at Elmsted, having with, them a horse and cart, which had been hired of a person in Canterbury. The prisoners had two horses and carts with them on the occasion of the robbery, one of them belonging to Stroud. The learned counsel produced a plan of the premises, to show the situation in which the prisoners were seen, especially Marshall, to lead to the inference that he was aiding and abetting in the removal of the stolen property; and after detailing a variety of particulars connected with the concert of the prisoners, together with their arrest, proceeded to call the following witnesses:—

J. B. Horn, assistant to Mr. Messenger, architect, of Folkestone, was examined as to the correctness of the plan produced, as regarded distances.

H. Rigden, mailman to prosecutor, deposed that on Wednesday, the 2nd of August, he left the malt-house locked and barred. There were forty or fifty quarters of malt in bin, but none in sack. Next morning found nineteen sacks, not belonging to his master, filled with malt.

John Attwood, landlord of the "Chance," at Canterbury, knew the prisoners; Cooke, Marshall, and King, were at his house on the 2nd of August, between ten and eleven o’clock; Cooke and Marshall lived at Canterbury, Stroud at Littlebourne, and King at Ramsgate. King met with an accident at his house on the previous Tuesday night, by which he was marked across the nose, and he put on a brown patch, which he had on the Wednesday.

Thomas Taylor, landlord of the "White Lion," Canterbury, knew the prisoners Cooke, Stroud, and Marshall, and spoke positively of the former two being at his house in the afternoon of the 2d August; he could not state so positively in respect of the last mentioned, though a man came in with a patch on his nose, but he believed that he did not communicate with the others.

Cross examined:— Never, to his knowledge, before saw King, and, therefore, was not able to say that he was the one who came with the patch on his nose.

Benjamin Barnes, licensed to let horses at Canterbury, remembered the prisoner Cooke hiring of him a bay horse, in the afternoon of the 2d of August, for the purpose, as he stated, of going about six miles into the country. The horse not being returned, he made inquiry, and found it at prosecutor’s house a week after.

Thomas Philpot, a boy in the employ of Mr. Church, at the "George," at Elmsted, deposed to two men coming to the "George," with a bay horse, about half-past eight, on the day in question, one of them having a patch on his nose. He pointed out the prisoner King as one of the men, and who bore the patch; he believed Cooke was the other. They came from Canterbury, and told Mr. Church they were going to Hythe, in which direction they went. They wore white coats or gaberdines, like those produced, though he was not quite sure, and did not slay long.

Cross-examined:— Could not recollect, when before the magistrates, whether they were gaberdines or coats worn by the men.

Re-examined:— Only King was before the magistrate; had not seen Cooke since that night.

James Fisher, shepherd to T. Rigden, of Cheriton, was at the "Star," at Newington, on the 2nd of August; had been to a cricket match, and on leaving the "Star" saw two carts with horses standing by the side of the road, about one hundred yards from the "Star." A man, who was with them, asked if the people were all gone from the "Star," which raised his suspicion, and he proceeded to Longport farm, about one hundred and fifty yards from the "Star," and there saw Sawkins, who agreed to watch with him (witness). Witness then proceeded towards the malt-house which was about a quarter of a mile from the "Star." Hearing a noise as he thought within the malt-house, or outside, he proceeded to the gate near the malt-house, and saw a man come from it with a sack on his back. He rushed towards the man who dropped the sack and ran away towards Mr. Dunn’s stack-yard; after that he saw another man, whom he pointed out to be Stroud, come out of the malt-house with another sack on his back. Witness collared him, and threw him down, on which another man came up and threatened him, with a violent expression, if he (witness) did not let his mate go. A third also struck him two blows. Witness did not let the one go of whom he had hold, but called loudly for assistance. They scuffled till they got into the river, where witness held him (the prisoner Stroud) full twenty minutes till assistance was rendered by Mr. Dunn, and then they took the prisoner to the "Star," and delivered him into the hands of Rye, the constable. On their way thither he saw Marshall on the road, with two horses and carts, at the place where he first saw him. He took him also into custody, and delivered him into the hands of Rye.

Cross-examined:- Saw some man with the carts as soon as he (witness) left the "Star;" it was a light night; did not see the man who ran away go into Dunn's stack-yard.

James Dunn, farmer at Newington, who was also at the "Star" on the night in question, deposed to seeing the two horses and carts standing by the side of the road, which excited his suspicions, and he went back and asked him for whom he was waiting; he replied his "governor." Witness returned to the "Star," but on hearing a hallooing went towards the malt-house, when he met two of the party who had been at the "Star" with a man who was stated to be King. On reaching the malt-house, he found Fisher and Stroud in the river. Witness helped them out, and went to Mr. Rigden's. On going to his father’s stack-yard he found a man, who proved to be Cooke, behind a wheat stack. He spoke to him three limes, but received no answer; on which witness collared him, who in return kicked him (witness). Witness threw him down, and with the aid of others gave him into Rye's custody. Witness, with others, afterwards secured Marshall, who was standing by the side of the horses and carts. Next morning witness found a bundle of clothes, consisting of two coats, in a field adjoining the road where the carts stood. Witness also took the other coats produced out of the carts.

Cross-examined.— Witness was of the cricketing party, but had not drunk more than to excite him a little.

John Oldham, carpenter, of Newington, who was one of the party at the "Star" on the day aforementioned, corroborated the evidence as to seeing Marshall with the horses and carts, and asking him if he had got a waiting job; to which he replied in the affirmative, and stated that the party was at the "Star." On that witness repaired again to the "Star," and finding that there was no one there for whom he could be waiting, returned towards the cart with the last witness, in doing which he heard a hallooing in the direction of the malt-house, and met King, who was walking very fast towards Folkestone, and was out of breath. In reply to a question from witness, he said he was going to Hythe, but witness told him he was in the wrong direction; and on his walking fast, witness bade him not to walk so fast, as he heard a hallooing, which he supposed the prisoner did also; but he said he did not, as he was deaf. On witness collaring him, he said he was in a hurry and wanted to get off. He replied in answer to a question by another person that he knew nothing of either Marshall or the carts; and, after detaining him twenty minutes, witness let him go again. He had no doubt of the prisoner King being the same man. Witness on a subsequent day, the 14th of August, went to Ramsgate, and there identified King as the man whom he had seen in the road. In reply to a question whether or not he knew anything of the malt robbery, he replied in the negative; and Kemp then took him into custody. Had a good opportunity of seeing King when detaining him on the 2nd of August; he had a patch on his nose. When taking him the second time he had a scar on his nose, at the same place where the patch had been.

George Rigden, son of prosecutor, who was at the "Star" on the evening in question, corroborated the evidence as to ageing Marshall in the way described, by the side of the road and the conversation that took place with him, as to its being suspicious that he was there with the carts and hearing the hallooing; together with King’s coming up, with a brown patch on his nose, and his subsequent arrest at Ramsgate. He spoke positively as to the identity of King, being the same man who was met on the road.

Cross-examined.— King had a mark on his nose when apprehended at Ramsgate; that was a part of his reason for believing him to be the same person who had been met on the road; beside which a lantern was held up to his face when on the road.

Thomas Kemp, constable at Hythe, who went with the last two witnesses to Ramsgate, on the 14th of August, Corroborated their testimony. On taking Cooke, Stroud, and Marshall to Maidstone, Cooke said they had thrown some garments over the hedge. King did not appear deaf when apprehended.

James Rye, constable at Newington, received into his custody, on the night in question, Cooke, Stroud, and Marshall. Picked up a pot near the "Star" door, when Cooke said, "It appears some one was going to serve that pot as we were going to serve the malt." Found a box of lucifer matches on Cooke.

Cross-examined.— Was quite sure the expression was what he had stated, and that Cooke used the word "we,"’ and not "they."

Thos. Rigden, the prosecutor, deposed to the malt in the malt-house being his property. Had seen the notices put in, sent to Mr. Delasaux on the behalf of Cook and Stroud, claiming the two carts and one horse which were in his (witness's) possession, being those which were taken on the night in question. On one of the carts were the words "John Stroud, fruiterer, Littlebourne." The horse and carts were still in his (witness's) possession. (The notices were then read threatening the prosecutor with actions of trover if the horse and carts were not given up).

Cross-examined:— Was ordered by the committing magistrate to detain the horse and carts.

Henry Rigden, son of the prosecutor, who went to the malt-house after seeing the prisoners safely lodged at the "Star," found the door unlocked, two sacks filled with malt outside, and seventeen others filled inside. One of them bore the name "Collard, Hoath Mill, 45," and the other "J. Sharpe, Canterbury." None of the sacks belonged to his father.

Mr. Rose objected to this evidence relating to the sacks when none were produced.

Examination continued:— Found a dark lantern in the malt-house, and a cap outside. There were about nineteen and a half quarters of malt in the sacks, the value being about £30.

Mr. Rose, in defence, did not attempt to dispute the evidence as regarded Stroud; but submitted there was not sufficient to convict either of the other three. In respect of King that there was not sufficient identity, and that as regarded Cook it was inexplicable how, if he had been concerned in the robbery, he should have remained so long in the stack-yard, as was alleged, after the man having been seen go thither, and his being taken out. In reference to Marshall also, he contended that he was not found to have been sufficiently near to render assistance as he was about a quarter of a mile from the place whence the malt was taken. The learned counsel then called two witnesses to speak to Stroud’s previous good character.

The Chairman in summing up, directed especial attention to Cooke’s expression on being taken to the "Star" as sufficient proof of his guilt; that King was amply identified, beside which he was seen running very much out of himself in the opposite direction whence the call for help came; and he directed attention to the account he gave of himself when accosted as to where he was going, and his pretence of deafness when there was no proof of it. As regarded Marshall there could be no doubt that he was in the road with the horses and carts, with the view of rendering assistance on the removal of the malt, which he substantiated by reading the law on the question, pointing out that if a man watched at a convenient distance for the purpose of preventing surprise to his companions and to favor their escape, or if necessary to come to their assistance, the knowledge of which was calculated to give them additional confidence, he was present aiding and abetting.

The jury, after a very brief consultation, returned a verdict of Guilty against all the prisoners.

The Chairman expressed his perfect concurrence in the verdict; and in passing sentence, said it was with great pain he addressed the prisoners, as the crime of which they had been guilty was one of a most serious nature, which they had evidently conducted in a way that proved to the Court they had made it their business, and that it was by no means the first attempt they had made in such a course. The planning of the robbery and the manner in which it had altogether been conducted convinced the Court that the prisoners were old offenders in the crime of which they stood convicted. It was absolutely necessary that the desperate attempts which were continually made in this way, on the property of the country should be put a stop to; and he knew of no other way in which that could be, but by making a most serious example of those cases which, like this, were brought home. The sentence which he was directed by the Court to pass was, that each of them be transported beyond the seas to the place which her Majesty should think fit for the term of ten years.

The severity of this sentence produced a great sensation in Court. The culprits had scarcely left the dock before they were recalled, when the Chairman stated that he had been in error, to thinking that he could not pass a lighter sentence than ten years’ transportation. Having been set right, he was directed to sentence the prisoners severally to be transported seven years. This, sorrowful as it was, came as some relief to the convicts, who, in the moment or two that had elapsed since the first passing of the sentence, had suffered something, as their countenances indicated.

The trial lasted nearly four hours.

 

Canterbury Journal 16 December 1848.

Mr. T. Delasaux held an adjourned inquest yesterday (Friday) at the Star public house, at Newington, next Hythe, on the body of Richard Barton, a chair bottomer, who had come to his death through a quarrel.

The depositions, as taken at each sitting, were the following:

Richard Marsh, of Newington, stated that on Friday night, a little before nine o'clock, he was in the public house above mentioned, as was the deceased, who was intoxicated.

John Baker and George Wells jun.: They were there drinking, and Baker said to the deceased “You had better go, or someone may steal your rushes”, upon which the deceased immediately took off his clothes and said “I will let your inside out”. Baker begged him to be quiet, and accordingly he sat down a short time, but got up again and pushed his hands towards the face of Baker, who held his hands up to prevent being struck. The contest continued for nearly half an hour. Deceased then took from his pocket a hog knife (produced), and held it towards Baker while wrangling was going on, and was in the act of sitting down again when Baker struck him on the right side of the head and he fell against the grate. Deceased was picked up an carried out of doors. Mr. George, a medical gentleman, residing at a distance of two miles, was sent for, but before his arrival deceased was dead.

George Wells, blacksmith, one of the company, corroborated portions of the above, adding that deceased asked Baker for some beer previous to his advising him to go lest he might lose his rushes, upon which deceased said “Do you mean to steal my rushes?” Baker replied “No. I mean someone will steal them”. The deceased replied “I will knock your head off”, and, placing himself in a fighting attitude, he put his fist close to the head of Baker, who defended himself by putting his hands before his face. This occurred several times. Deceased was much excited, and by his threatening language and menacing attitude, and being close to Baker, he (witness), had he been in Baker's place, should have considered his life in danger. Shortly after this, Baker struck him, and he fell against the grate. He was immediately conveyed out of doors, and afterwards into the stable.

John Paramore also spoke to the violent conduct of the deceased, and of his attempting to take something Baker was eating, when Baker told him he should not have any, and that he had better go and mind his rushes or someone would steal them. Witness detailed the subsequent proceedings as already given, and of deceased's appearing very ill when he was conveyed outside.

Mr. E. George, surgeon, of Folkestone, who was called in to the deceased between eleven and twelve o'clock at night, when lying in the Star stable, deposed that on his arrival he found the deceased dead, and nearly cold. On an external examination he found a narrow wound of an inch in length in the front of the chin, extending to the bone, a narrow, superficial wound in the right cheek, and a severe contusion on the right ear and the parts adjacent. He also found a quantity of extravenated blood in the integuments of the right external ear, passing immediately above and behind. The vessels on the entrance of the brain were slightly congested; otherwise the general appearances of the brain were healthy; nor were there any morbid appearances, sufficient to cause death on the chest and abdomen. On Thursday he further examined the upper part of the spine, and found the vertebrae, ligaments and marrow perfectly sound and healthy. He was of opinion that the deceased died from a severe concussion of the brain, which might have been occasioned by a blow.

As it appeared very clear that Baker had acted only in self-defence, a verdict of “Justifiable homicide” was returned.

 

Kentish Gazette 19 December 1848.

Inquest by Mr. Delasaux: On Monday, at Newington, near Hythe, on Richard Barton. It appeared that deceased, with a number of others, among whom was one John Baker, were drinking at the Star-tap on Friday evening, when deceased, taking offence at some words, struck at Baker, upon which the latter stabbed him with a large knife, which caused his death.

 

Kentish Gazette 27 June 1854.

On Friday Mr. Eaden held an inquest, at the Star Inn, Newington, next Hythe, on the body of Edward Nutley, who died a short lime after going to bed.

Mr W. Bateman, surgeon, examined the body, and had no doubt that death was caused by the rupture of a blood vessel on the brain. He had attended deceased, and from bit full habit of body, he believed immediate death from apoplexy had resulted.

Ann Nutley, widow of deceased, stated to her having retired to rest with her husband at about nine o'clock, in his usual good health, - that about 12 she was awoke by his suddenly turning in bed. She spoke to him but received no reply. She lifted his bead from the pillow but he died immediately. Deceased was 67 years of age.

Verdict, “Natural Death.”

 

Kentish Gazette 23 October 1855.

East Kent Quarter Sessions: The Michaelmas Sessions was held on Tuesday last before J.B. Wildman Esq. (Chairman), and the following Magistrates: Sir Norton J. Knatchbull, Bart, Right Hon. S.R. Lushington, E. Foss, W.A. Munn, G.E. Sayer, W. Delmar, W.H. Forley, T.H. Mackay, W.A. Burra, F.F. Lonsdale, G. Gipps, W. Hyder, Esqs., Revs. E. Biron, G.W. Sicklemore, and H. Hilton.

Joseph Gess, 41, charged with having, on the 28th August, stolen a quantity of barley, the property of Frederick Brockman, at Cheriton.

The prisoner underwent examination with another party before the magistrates; that other party was acquitted. and the prisoner would have been dealt with summarily, it being a petty offence, but for his preferring trial by a jury.

Frederick Philpott, farm bailiff to prosecutor, deposed that on going to the stable at the Star, Newington, he saw prisoner’s horse, as well as those of the two Bakers, eating some barley, and he asked stated that Otto evinced no hesitation in reply to his questions.

Mr. Biron having addressed the jury for the defence, called Lieutenant Carel Stucker, of the British Foreign Legion, who deposed that, having ordered a pair of trousers of Otto, he saw him on the 1st October, when he informed him (witness) that he had purchased for 30s.. some clothes of a man who had had them sent to him from Germany, and which were too small for him. The clothes produced were the same excepting the trousers. Knowing Otto he believed him to be a very honest man.

Edward F. Barnard Von Roff, a German advocate residing in London, also spoke highly of the character and respectability of Otto.

The prisoner Karstadt’s statement before the magistrate», which was put in, was to the effect that one of his comrades said the man Wilkins wanted to sell the case for a shilling, which he gave for it; that it was placed down, and some of the soldiers kicked it open, when it was found to contain the clothes, and, by their advice he sold them.

The Chairman, in summing up, observed that the best proof of a person knowing goods to be stolen when he bought them was that of his giving a very inadequate price for them; but this was not the case in the present instance, a.» Otto had given 33s. for four articles, and sold three of them for 30s. They might therefore infer that there was no object on his part to make a considerable profit by them. With respect to Karstadt, him how it was their horses were eating Mr Brockman's barley , upon which Gess asked if no one else grew barley; but seeing it littered from the field to the spot where the horses were eating, he had reason for supposing it was Mr. Brockman’s. Afterwards, when he got into the road with his horse, he said to witness, “Now come and stop me with my horse in the high road,” to which witness replied, that “he had nothing to do with the horse; all that concerned him was Mr. Brockman's property."

Wm. Raines, who was at the Star on the evening in question, spoke to seeing the horses eating the barley.

Henry Maycock, constable of Newington, went to the Star in consequence of having been sent for, and saw Gess and the Bakers, whom he did not lake into custody, as he knew them. The barley in the road corresponded with that in the field. He slated, in cross-examination, that Gess said if he wanted him, he would stay till the morning; but witness knowing him, told him that he did not wish then to detain him.

Mr. Horn, in defence, ridiculed the case as trilling and absurd, when it was alleged against the prisoner simply because In asked whether nobody else but Mr. Brockman grew barley. All three of the parties were equally guilty, but the one who was had before the magistrate was discharged, and the other was not brought up at all. The prisoner was no more guilty than they, and had it not been for his electing to come here, in all probability he would have been discharged with Baker.

The Chairman took quite a different view, and pointed out that the prisoner had laid particular claim to the barley when the bailiff interfered, which perhaps distinguished his case from the other’s in the eyes of the magistrates. Not Guilty.

Caroline Hunter, 21, and Mary Ann Hunt. 28. charged with having, on the 13th October, stolen a tablecloth, the property of George Ward, at Cheriton. Prosecutor was an innkeeper and mess-master to the British Foreign Legion at Shorncliffe, and saw the cloth on the table of the mess-room on the 9th.

George Collins, who kept the White Lion at Cheriton, deposed to the prisoners coming there to sell a tablecloth; and seeing the name of George Ward on it. he asked them if they knew to whom it belonged, on which they said they received it from a soldier. He detained it and sent for a policeman, to whom he gave it and the prisoners.

W. F. Green, Police Constable, took the prisoners as detailed by last witness, and to whom they stated that a soldier of the name of George Ward had given it to them.

The jury returned a verdict of Guilty.

The last-mentioned witness, on being recalled, stated that it was impossible the women could have stolen the cloth, as they were not allowed to enter the camp; and the prosecutor himself stated his belief that some of the soldiers bad stolen it when they were clearing away the things after a party.

The jury were asked if they intended to find the prisoners guilty of receiving as well, with which they were charged, upon which the foreman observed that they ought to have had such evidence before. However, reconsidering their verdict, they pronounced them guilty of having unlawful possession of it.—One month in the House of Correction.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 21 August 1858.

Wednesday August 18th:- Before the Mayor, James Kelcey and Gilbert Kennicott esqs.

Peter McGowan was brought up on remand charged with obtaining money under false pretences from Henry Swain, landlord of the Foresters Arms, Shellons Lane. Prisoner was undefended. From the evidence, it appeared the prisoner went to the house to lodge on the Saturday previous, representing himself as a Captain, of the Elizabeth and Ann, of Carlisle; he remained there until the following Monday morning, and borrowed money under the pretence of having a sum of money in the Folkestone Bank, at the same time showing Mr. Swain a cheque on the Folkestone Bank. Swain accompanied prisoner to the bank on the Monday morning, when he made an excuse and said his money had been sent to Dover in mistake. Swain then went with prisoner to the railway station, but missing the train they went into the Swan public house for refreshment, when the prisoner contrived to give Swain the slip. No more was seen of the prisoner until the following Wednesday morning, when Mr. Wells, of the Star, at Newington, came to Folkestone in search of the so-called “Captain”, he having previously paid Wells a visit, staying for some days at his house, and managing to obtain from him the sum of £3, under the pretence of having money in the Ashford Bank. The two victims went in company to the Black Bull, and there found prisoner trying on the same “artful dodge” with the landlord of that house. He was afterwards taken into custody, and remanded until this day. Prisoner had nothing to say in his defence, and was fully committed for trial at the next quarter sessions.

From communications since received by the superintendent of police, it appears the prisoner had been to Sheerness, and Boughton, where he obtained from various persons, sums of money in the whole amounting to about £10, by the same artful means; he had also been to Ashford and Canterbury, where he had not only obtained money, but in one instance a suit of clothes. From papers found on him it appeared prisoner had been a time-keeper on the Silloth Harbour and Dock Works, Carlisle, for a period of two years; he also had a contract in his possession for the purchase of a large quantity of oak timber from Mr. George Austen of Canterbury, together with a letter from that gentleman, accompanying a copy of the agreement for prisoner’s signature.

 

From the Folkestone Chronicle 1st October 1858.

QUARTER SESSIONS

Peter McGowan, mariner, pleaded not guilty to an indictment charging him with obtaining by false pretences the sum of 2s., with intent to defraud William Henry Swain, at Folkestone, on 9th August 1858.

 

The case was commenced and gone into some extent, when the Recorder stopped it from there being no evidence to contradict a statement that the prisoner had made to Mr. Leith, the manager of the Folkestone Bank, that he (prisoner) had a sum of money in the London and County Bank. His Honour said the case could not go on, but the jury must acquit the prisoner. The Recorder discharged him with a caution. He was however immediately taken into custody and conveyed to Hythe to be examined on another charge of obtaining money from Charles Wells, landlord of the "Star Inn", Newington.

Note: Case originally refers to "Foresters Arms," Folkestone.
 

Folkestone Chronicle 2 October 1858.

Quarter Sessions.

Friday 1st October:-

Peter McGowan, mariner, pleaded not guilty to an indictment charging him with obtaining by false pretences the sum of 2s., with intent to defraud William Henry Swain, at Folkestone, on 9th August 1858.

The case was commenced and gone into some extent, when the Recorder stopped it from there being no evidence to contradict a statement that the prisoner had made to Mr. Leith, the manager of the Folkestone Bank, that he (prisoner) had a sum of money in the London and County Bank. His Honour said the case could not go on, but the jury must acquit the prisoner. The Recorder discharged him with a caution. He was however immediately taken into custody and conveyed to Hythe to be examined on another charge of obtaining money from Charles Wells, landlord of the Star Inn, Newington.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 23 October 1858.

East Kent Quarter Sessions.

October 19th -20th.

Peter McGowan, 39, traveller, was convicted of stealing one pair of trousers, value 20s., the property of William Howland, at Boughton, on the 3rd August, 1858; also of obtaining by false pretences £2 of the said William Howland on the same day; also of obtaining by false pretences £1 from Eliza Wells, at Newington, on the 10th August; and also of obtaining by false pretences £1 from Charles Wells, at Newington, on the 11th August.

This fellow, by the evidence adduced, appeared to have been going about the country victimising all he could get hold of by pretending he was a large timber dealer, having considerable sums of money in the London and County Bank, at Rochester, and also at Ashford, and borrowing from all who would lend. Evidence was given charged of the falsehood of the statements against him respecting his “bank accounts”, and also of his having been convicted of a like offence.

Prisoner was sentenced to 12 months’ hard labour, with one day in addition for each of the various offences charged against him, and of which he was convicted.

 

From the Kentish Chronicle, Saturday, 8 September, 1859. Price 1½d.

STAR INN, NEWINGTON

To Pork Butchers and Others.

To be sold by auction.

By Mr. C. T. Armitage.

At the "Star Inn," Newington, on Thursday, October, 13th, 1859.

About Seventy Pigs, of various sizes and superior breed, some fat and fit for killing, from three to five score each.

Sale to commence at One o'clock.

 

Southeastern Gazette 3 July 1860.

Inquest.

An inquest was held at the Star, in this parish, on Wednesday last, by T. T. Delasaux, Esq., touching the death of William Jenkins, a gunner in the Royal Artillery stationed at Shorncliffe. The circumstances will be found detailed in the following evidence :—

Thomas Coppin, an artilleryman, deposed that the deceased was in the same regiment as himself, and slept in the same room in the bed adjoining his. On Sunday night witness went to bed at about nine o’clock, when he saw the deceased in bed. At twenty minutes past ten he was awoke by something rattling on the floor, and found that the deceased was out of bed. The last time witness spoke to the deceased he appeared in his right senses.

William Neale, a gunner in the Royal Artillery, proved that he was called at twenty minutes past ten on Sunday night by the last witness. He got up, put his hand into his box, and found that his razor and case were gone. On perceiving the deceased lying on the floor, bleeding from the throat, witness procured a light, and afterwards spoke to the deceased, but he made no reply and threw the razor towards him.

Mr. Thos. Grey, surgeon, Royal Artillery, deposed that he had known the deceased for the past two months, and had attended him professionally during that time. On Sunday last he saw deceased twice, when he was exceedingly weak and complained of a choking sensation in the upper part of his throat. He had not noticed anything in the conduct of the deceased to induce him to think that he was insane. It was not infrequent in the complaint under which the deceased was suffering that delirium should supervene.

Wm. Kinseller, a private in the Army Hospital Corps, had attended upon the deceased for the past two months, and with very few exceptions he considered he was in a sound state of mind.

The jury returned the following verdict: That the deceased destroyed himself by cutting his throat, but there is no evidence to show the state of mind in which he was at the time.

 

Southeastern Gazette 4 December 1866.

Hythe County Sessions.

Thursday: Before the Rev. E. Biron, Captain Kirkpatrick, and T. Denne and J. J. Lonsdale, Esqs.

John Gaines, of Lyminge, carrier, was summoned for assaulting Henry Maycock, of Newington, innkeeper, on the 17th ult.

Fined 2s. 6d., costs 12s. 6d.

 

Folkestone Express 17 January 1885.

Hythe Police.

Thursday, January 15th: Before Major Kirkpatrick, Dr. Wildash, A. Denne and E.B. Walker Esqs.

James Mowll and Charles White were summoned for being drunk and refusing to quit licensed premises.

Mr. Maycock, landlord of the Star Inn, Newington, said on the previous Saturday about 5.30 the prisoners came into his house. He went into the tap room to see if all was right, and he saw a pot and glass on the floor. The prisoners were both standing there with five or six more. He asked who broke the pots, but nobody knew anything about it. Prisoners refused to help pay, and after that another pot was broken, and a paraffin lamp and spittoon were put on the fire. He asked the prisoners to leave the house. They then came to the bar, and asked to be served with more beer, but he refused to let them have it. They had had a little beer, but were not drunk. Mowll threatened to strike witness twice between the eyes. White also threatened to break the windows and the pots and glasses. They both refused to leave, and witness then sent for Sergeant Hoad, but they left the house about ten minutes before that officer arrived.

James Goodham, a labourer, deposed to hearing Mowll threaten to strike the landlord, and White said if the prosecutor did not give him his eight-pence he would break all the pots and glasses in the house.

Mowll asserted that somebody had taken a quart of ale that he had paid for, and he was not in the tap room when the lamp was put on the fire.

White said when he was asked to help pay for the broken pot he found the landlord had not given him his proper change. He asked for it and then the landlord said he was trying to best him.

They were fined 10s. each and costs 10s. 6d., in default one month’s hard labour.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 31 January 1885.

Inquest.

The East Kent Coroner (R.M. Mercer Esq.) held an inquest respecting the cause of death of George Amos, a farm labourer, on Friday week, at the Star Inn, Newington, Hythe, Kent.

Henry Amos, farm labourer, brother of deceased, deposed that deceased, who was 49 years of age, lived at Newington. Witness last saw him alive at about six o’clock on the previous Wednesday evening, when he was with him for about twenty minutes. Deceased, who was a waggoner to Mr. Brockman, then went into the stables with some harness. He heard deceased’s mate inside. The deceased had a touch of sunstroke eight years ago whilst working for Mr. Woollett. Deceased had lived at Mr. Brockman’s for the last 24 years. He had complained to witness often of having headaches, but had not complained of any pain for the past few weeks. Witness did not notice anything peculiar about him on Wednesday. Deceased was a quiet man, and was quite sober when he last saw him alive. Witness was not aware that his brother had any trouble which might lead him to take his life. Witness went to the stable at about 4 a.m. on the previous day and watered his horses. He heard the pails clinking in deceased’s stables, and he thought his brother was watering his horses too. About a quarter to six his nephew, Alfred Amos came to him and asked whether his father was there. He said “No”. His nephew said he had been to deceased’s stable to find his father, but could not get in as the door was locked. Witness went across and tried the door. It was not fastened, but it fitted the frame tight. When he got inside he looked about and went into the hay loft, where he saw deceased hanging by a rope round his neck attached to the couplings. His feet were about ten inches off the ground. There was a plank there, which witness believed his brother slid or threw himself off. Witness immediately cut him down, but he was quite dead. Only himself and his nephew were there when deceased was found.

Alfred Amos, son of the deceased, corroborated.

The jury returned a verdict that deceased was strangled by his own act while he was insane.

 

Folkestone Express 31 January 1885.

Inquest.

The East Kent Coroner (R.M. Mercer Esq.) on Friday held an inquest at the Star Inn, Newington, on the body of George Amos, 49 years of age, a waggoner in the employ of Mr. Brockman. Henry Amos, a farm labourer, stated that he last saw his brother alive on Wednesday evening last. He was then in his company for about 20 minutes, and left him going into Mr. Brockman’s stable, where the mare was. Deceased had a touch of sunstroke some eight years ago, whilst in the employ of Mr. Woollett, and since that time had often complained of headache. He had not, however, mentioned the subject for some weeks of late, and witness had noticed nothing particular about him. He was always a quiet man, and was invariably sober. At about four o’clock on Thursday morning witness went to the stable and was watering his horses. He heard the sound of a pail in the next stable, and from that believed deceased was also attending to his horses. At about a quarter to six o’clock Alfred Amos asked witness where his father was, as he had not been home to breakfast. They both went to deceased’s stable, and there found him hanging in the hay loft by a rope, which was fastened round his neck and attached to the couplings. His feet were about ten inches from the ground, and life was quite extinct. A verdict of Found Dead was recorded.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 24 January 1891.

Inquest.

Mr. Fielding, Deputy Coroner for East Kent, held an inquest upon the bodies at the Star Inn, Newington, yesterday afternoon.

Stephen Hayward stated that the bodies which the jury had just viewed were those of Alfred Hayward, aged 34, Sarah Hayward, aged 33, and Annie Hayward, aged five months. Hayward was his brother, and was a labourer. Sarah Hayward was his brother’s wife.

William Hayward was then called, and deposed: I am ten years of age. Alfred and Sarah Hayward were my father and mother, and the little girl was my sister. I went to bed about seven on Tuesday night in my father’s house, which has now been swept away by the landslip. I was sleeping in the same room as my sister, Jane, aged eight, and my little brother, who is one year and eight months old. It was in the front of the house. The house was built just under the hill, and in front of my house there is a roadway, and then a steep bank beyond that. I went to sleep, and when I first awoke I felt the wind blowing very cold, and I found that I was lying in the open field. There was no covering over me at all. No bed clothes were over me. I was naked. My little brother and sister were lying a short way from me. It was dark, and they were covered up by a large piece of the thatch from the roof of the house. I called out, and when I heard them crying I went to help them. I pulled the thatch off, and got them out. My sister then went across the field in the direction of Mr. Mount’s house, and I followed up with my little brother, whom I carried up. Mrs. Mount took us in and put us to bed. I knew what had happened. The water and the earth had come down and swept the house away. It was raining hard at the time. The house was all broken up. My father, mother, and baby also slept in the house, but I did not call out for them when I found the position I was in. I did not seem to think about that. I had to carry my little brother the whole of the way, and lift him over the fence and the wattles.

The Coroner remarked that he had acted in a very heroic manner.

George Mount, an elderly man, a thatcher, living at Lime Kiln Cottage, said the ill-fated house was about 400 yards from his house. The last witness went to his house about one o’clock on Wednesday morning. He knocked at the door and called “Mr. Mount”. When he opened the door he found them standing out in the rain. He asked them where their mother and father were, and they answered that they could not find them. Witness had a fire lighted, and the children put in his bed. He, with his son – Alfred Burgess – then went down to the house and found what had happened. The depth of the bank in front of the house was some twenty or thirty feet. They walked about the ruins to try to find the missing. They called, but could not make anyone hear. He sent Burgess for assistance, and at three o’clock the police came. The water kept running down the hill like a waterfall. It made a great noise. They had to work a long time before they came to the bodies.

Sergeant Hoad, of the Kent County Constabulary, stationed at Cheriton, said: About half past two on Wednesday morning, the 21st inst., I received a message from the last witness, saying that a house belonging to Mr. Hammond, and occupied by Hayward, had been washed away. I proceeded there at once with a police constable. Upon arriving there I met the last witness and Mr. Hammond. The house had been completely washed over the road and down the bank. Some of the remains I found to be sixty or seventy yards away from the place where the house was situated. I got a number of men with forks and they removed large quantities of earth from various places where we thought it likely to find the missing. You could see very little of the house at all. The ruins were covered over with earth, except one or two pieces of thatch. At one place, when we had moved several cartloads of earth, a live sheep jumped out and ran away. I afterwards came across a piece of a bedstead, a blanket and some other bedding, and, as I surmised, we then found the bodies. Everything in the house seemed to have been turned bottom-upwards. The bodies were, therefore, lying on the bed-clothes which would have been at the top of them when in bed. They were quite dead, but the bodies were warm and dry. The baby was lying underneath the female. There must have been three or four tons of earth above them. The man’s head was very much battered about and the female’s ankles were both broken. In fact, all the bodies were very badly bruised and battered, and there was enough earth upon them to have caused suffocation. It was about ten minutes to five when we got the bodies out; we found them at half past four. Had it been daylight we should have got them much sooner. I first noticed the woman’s feet. The bodies were all together.

In summing up, the Coroner spoke very highly of the conduct of the boy, William. He thought he had acted with great presence of mind for a lad of his years, and much credit was due to him for his bravery.

After a short consultation the jury returned a verdict to the effect that death in each case was caused by suffocation, in consequence of a landslip.

 

Folkestone Herald 24 January 1891.

The inquest was held at the Star Inn, Newington, on Friday, by the Deputy Coroner, Mr. Fielding. Mr. Pilcher was chosen Foreman of the jury, and the following evidence was given:-

Stephen Hayward, brother of the deceased, Alfred Hayward, said: I live at Stanford, near Hythe; labourer. My deceased brother was 34 years of age, and a labourer. Sarah Hayward, 33, was his wife, and Annie Hayward was their child, aged five months. I have seen the bodies, and identify them. They are now lying in a lodge at Newington.

William Hayward, ten years of age: The deceased were my father, mother, and sister. Early on Wednesday morning I was in bed. I went to bed about seven o’clock on Tuesday evening. My sister, Jane, and my brother, Walter, were in the same room. It was at the back of the house, which was just under the hill. In front of the house was a road, and a dip down a steep bank. When I first woke up the wind was blowing, and the water running down, and I was thrown out right into the open air. I had no clothes on besides my bedclothes. My brother and sister were near me, lying down on the ground. They were not far off. It was quite dark. The thatch of the roof was over them, which I got off. I heard them crying, and went to help them. I pulled them out. My sister went first up to the house of Mr. Mount. I remained to help Walter out, and took him up to the house. I saw Mr. Mount; he took us in and put us to bed. The water an the earth had come down with the house. It was raining at the time. It had driven our house down the road and over the banl. The house was all broken up. I did not know where my father and mother were. I carried Walter up to Mr. Mount. I did not hear my father and mother calling. I got over the fence and over the wattles with my brother.

The Coroner said the witness had given his evidence very accurately and intelligently.

George Mount, Limekiln Cottage, Cheriton, thatcher, about 400 yards from the scene of the accident, said: I remember the last witness coming about 1 o’clock in the morning to my house, on Wednesday the 21st. I heard a noise of a child crying, and a rap on the door, and the little boy helloed out “Mrs. Mount” three times. I got up and opened the door when the poor little things stood at the door and said they wanted to come in. I said “Where’s your mother and father?” They said “We can’t find them”. I could not understand, only that he said he had come up through the thatch and they were very wet. I had a fire lighted, and told my daughter to put the children in my bed. I then went down to the house with my son-in-law, Albert Burgess. I found what had happened, and went into the field and saw the ruins lay there. The bank down which the house had gone was about 20 feet deep. We called around the ruins, but could not make anyone hear. I sent Burgess to the police constable at Cheriton, who came about 3 o’clock, and brought help with him. I was there; it was moonlight and went to work to find the bodies. The children were without shoes, and in their shirts, just as they had gone to bed. The water ran down the hill like a waterfall. I could hear it at my house. We worked some time before the bodies were found. They were all three dead.

David Hoad, Sergeant, Kent County Constabulary, stationed at Cheriton, said: About half past two on Wednesday morning I received a message from Burgess saying that a house belonging to Mr. Hambrook had been washed down by a landslip. I at once got up, and went with the constable to the spot. I met Mr. Hambrook with the last witness. I found the house, which was all to pieces, had been washed over the road into the field. Some of the house was forty or fifty yards from where it originally stood. I got assistance, and they brought spades and forks with them. We removed a quantity of earth to find the bodies. I saw two or three pieces of thatch, and pulled it to pieces. We saw a part of a bedstead projecting from the ground, and on removing quantities of earth, a live sheep jumped up and ran away. Another man could see a part of a bedstead, and after a while we got out the bedding, and there were the bodies, lying not quite on their sides. The three bodies were quite dead, but warm and dry. The baby was under it’s mother. There were two or three cartloads of earth over the bedsteads. The heads of the deceased were lying westward. The husband’s head was much knocked about, and the wife’s legs appeared broken. It was about half past four when we found the bodies, and got them out about ten minutes to five o’clock. It was very dark, or we should have found the bodies sooner. There was sufficient earth over the bodies to cause suffocation.

The Coroner said it was evident the destruction of the house was caused by the landslip. The little boy gave his evidence remarkably well, and acted with great presence of mind, and very bravely. The deceased had no doubt been suffocated by the earth which had fallen upon them.

“Death caused by suffocation through the landslip”.

The funeral of the deceased took place immediately after the inquest, at Newington Churchyard.

 

Folkestone Express 28 January 1891.

Inquest.

The inquest was held at the Star Inn, Newington, on Friday at noon before Mr. Fielding, Deputy Coroner.

Sergt. Hoad, of the County Police, had charge of the inquest, and conducted the jury to view the bodies and the scene of the catastrophe, which was three quarters of a mile distant, and half an hour was occupied in the journey.

Stephen Hayward, a labourer, of Stanford, Hythe, identified the bodies as those of his brother, sister-in-law, and their baby. Alfred Hayward was 34. He lived at Newington, and was a labourer. Sarah, his wife, was 33, and Annie, five months.

William Hayward, son of the deceased, who had a very black eye, which he received when the house fell, said: I am ten years old. Alfred Hayward and Sarah Hayward were my father and mother, and the little girl was my sister. I went to bed about seven on Tuesday evening in my father’s house at Newington. My sister, Jane, and brother, Walter were in the same room. Our room was at the back of the house. The house stood just underneath the hill, and in front of it there was a road, and beyond it a steep bank. I went to sleep. When I woke up I felt the wind blowing and the water running. I was not in my bed, but out in the field. There was no covering over me at all. There were no bedclothes on me, nor any clothes. My brother and sister were near me. We were all lying on the ground, not far away from one another. It was dark. There was a piece of thatch over my brother and sister. I heard them crying and went to them, pulled the thatch off them, and got them out. My sister went up to Mount’s house to tell him to come down while I was getting my brother out. When I got him out, I carried him up to Mount’s house, and Mount took us all in and put us to bed. The water and earth had come down on the house and knocked it down. It was raining at the time. Our house was driven over the road and down the bank, and it was all broken up.

By a juror: I did not know where my father and mother were. They were all in the house when I went to bed. I carried my little brother to Mount’s house. I did not call for my father and mother when I found myself in the field. I got over the fence and the wattles with my little brother.

George Mount said: I am a thatcher, and live at Lime Kiln Cottage, Cheriton, about 400 or 500 yards from where the accident took place. I was in my cottage on Tuesday night, when the children came to my house about one o’clock and woke me up. I heard a little child cry first, and the little boy rapped and called out “Mr. Mount” three times. I got up and opened the door and saw the children standing there. I asked them what they wanted, and they said “We want to come in”. I asked them where their father and mother were, and the boy said “We can’t find them”. I told my daughter to light a fire as quickly as possible. The boy said he came up through the thatch, and that was all I could understand. The children were put into my bed. My son-in-law, Albert Burgess, and I then went to the house. We did not know then that the house was down. We could not find it, and I called out and got no answer. Then I looked over into the field and saw the ruins lying there. The bank in front of the house was about 20 ft. deep, and the house had been forced over the bank by the weight of water and the earth. We walked about the ruin and called out to see if we could make anyone hear, but could not. I sent Burgess for the police constable who lives at Cheriton, about a mile away. It was three o’clock when the policeman arrived. It was then moonlight.

By a juror: The children were dressed in their shirts only. The water was rushing down the side of the hill like a river. I could hear it up at my house. I could see there had been a slip of the land.

By the Coroner: I was there when the bodies were found. We had been digging some time before we found them. All three were dead.

Sergt. Hoad, K.C.C., said: I am stationed at Cheriton. About half past two on Wednesday morning, the 21st inst., I received a message from Burgess that a house belonging to Mr. Hambrook, that the carter resided in, had been washed down. I got up, called the constable, and proceeded to the spot. We arrived a few minutes past three. I met Mr. Hambrook and Mount, and found the house had been washed over the road, down the bank into Mr. Brockman’s field, and was all to pieces. Some of the remains of the house were 40 or 50 yards away from the spot where it stood. I got Mr. Hambrook to get another man or two, and they brought forks. We moved a quantity of earth where we thought it likely the bodies would be found. I saw two or three pieces of the thatched roof, and we pulled them to pieces and moved them.The first place was where we saw part of a bedstead projecting. We moved some cartloads of earth, and there came out a live sheep. I hoped then that the inmates might be alive. The constable called my attention to another portion of a bedstead sticking out of the earth. We dug there and got the bedstead out, and also the mattress and bed. The bodies were found lying partly on their sides underneath the bed, which had evidently turned bottom upwards. The bodies were quite dead, but warm and dry. No doctor saw them to my knowledge. The baby was lying under it’s mother. I should think we moved two or three tons of earth from above the bodies. Their heads were lying westward. The bodies were very much battered about, and the woman’s legs were broken near the ankles. They could not have lived in the position we found them – they must have been smothered. It was ten minutes to five when we got the bodies out – we found them about half past four. We put the bodies on a gate and carried them to a stable. Had it been daylight, no doubt we should have found the bodies earlier. It was not then raining, but bitterly cold and freezing. I found the deceased’s watch, which was going.

The Coroner having summed up, the jury returned a verdict of “Death from Suffocation, from the result of a landslip”.

The Coroner said a word ought to be said for the way in which the little boy had acted. He acted with great presence of mind, and great credit was due to him for the manner in which he behaved.

Sergt. Hoad stated incidentally that when the first body was carried into the stable, a man who had been sleeping there woke up and ran out, scared at the sight.

 

Folkestone Chronicle 2 April 1892.

Inquest.

An inquest was held at the Star Inn, Newington, on Wednesday afternoon by Mr. R.M. Mercer (County Coroner), touching the death of Jesse Boughton, of Barham, who was crushed to death by an engine passing over his body on Monday afternoon.

The jury having viewed the body, William Golder was called, and stated that he lived at 176, London Road, Dover, and that he was in charge of a traction engine on Monday, and was proceeding from Cheriton to Beechboro’. The deceased was employed as a flagman. About 1.45 he was going round the corner of Frogholt, where there were high banks on either side, and, on looking over the side of his engine, he was horrified to see deceased lying in the road, dreadfully crushed. Witness immediately put the brake on, and brought the engine up within eight feet of where the accident occurred. He got off the engine and found that life was extinct. From the position of the body he should imagine deceased had stopped to light his pipe, which appeared to have been newly filled, and some matches were lying beside him. He could not see deceased before the accident because his attention was diverted by a cart, which he was passing on the other side. The engine was going very slowly – not more than half a mile an hour. Deceased ought to have been at least 30 yards in front.

Henry Amos said he was in charge of the cart which the previous witness had spoken of. He had left it in the roadway for a few moments, and when he returned he found the driver getting off his engine to go to the deceased. He did not witness the accident.

William Boughton, of Chartham, identified the deceased as his son, who, he said, was 34 years of age. He was a single man.

The jury returned a verdict of “Accidental Death”.

 

Folkestone Herald 2 April 1892.

Inquest.

An inquest was held at the Star, Newington, on Wednesday afternoon last by Mr. R. Mercer, County Coroner, touching the death of Jessie Boughton (35), who met his death under the following distressing circumstances. The jury having viewed the body, the following evidence was taken:

W. Golden, of 176, London Road, Buckland, said he was in charge of a steamroller on Monday last, and was proceeding from Cheriton to Beechborough. The deceased was employed as flagman. About 1.45 he was going round the corner of Frogholt, where there were high banks on each side, and looking over the engine saw deceased lying in the road. Witness immediately stopped and got down, when he found the front wheel had passed over his head. From the appearance of deceased he should imagine he had stopped to light his pipe, for matches and a newly-filled pipe were lying beside him. He could not see deceased because he was looking after a cart on the other side. The engine was going very slow, not more than half a mile an hour. Deceased should have been 30 yards in front.

Henry Amos said he was in charge of the cart the previous witness had spoken of. He had left it only for a few moments, and when he returned found the driver getting off the engine to go to deceased.

William Boughton, of Chartham, said the deceased was his son. He was about thirty four years of age, and a single man.

The jury returned a verdict of “Accidental Death”.

 

Sandgate Visitors’ List 2 April 1892.

Inquest.

An inquest was held at the Star Inn, Newington, on Wednesday, on the body of Jesse Boughton, who met his death on the previous Monday night under painful circumstances, by being run over by a traction engine. W. Golder said on the night in question he was driving an engine in the neighbourhood of Beachborough. Deceased was employed as flagman, and his duty was to walk in front of the engine, some thirty yards off. Witness chanced to look over the side of the engine, and saw deceased lying in the road with his head dreadfully crushed. By a newly-filled pipe and matches that were lying beside him, he presumed that he was engaged in lighting his pipe, and by some means fell down. The engine was going very slowly.

William Boughton identified the body as that of his son. He was 35 years of age, and was single.

The jury returned a verdict of “Accidental Death”.

 

Southeastern Gazette 5 April 1892.

Inquest.

An inquest was held at the Star Inn, Newington, on Tuesday on the body of a man named Jessie Poughdon, belonging to Barham, and in the employ of the County Council who was crushed to death on the previous day whilst acting as flag bearer to a steam roller which was at work on a road near Frogholt. The unfortunate man was in front of the engine in the act of lighting his pipe. At the time the engine was at a standstill, but, as a horse and trap was approaching, the driver started the engine to make room. It is supposed that the heel of the deceased’s boot was caught in the wheel of the roller, the result being that he was thrown down, and the ponderous machine passed over him, smashing his head, flat and cutting off his foot, which was found embedded in the earth.

A verdict of “Accidentally killed” was returned.

 

Sandgate Weekly News 16 September 1893.

Local News.

The Annual Licensing Meeting for the renewal of licences for the Elham Division (which includes Sandgate) was held at Hythe on Thursday, the Magistrates present being Dr. W.E. Alston and Dr. Lovegrove.

The report of Supt. Waghorne was read, and was very favourable, no complaints being made.

Superintendent Waghorne said he wished to make one amendment, the Star Inn, at Newington, was not conducted as it should be. He thought, perhaps, the Magistrates would caution Mr. Henry Maycock, the landlord.

All the licences were renewed, and in cautioning Maycock, Dr. Alston said the Bench were sorry to hear of the complaint. They had generally a very excellent report of the public houses in that Division, and they hoped that in future he would endeavour to conduct his house in a proper manner.

 

Whitstable Times and Herne Bay Herald 23 September 1893.

HYTHE. COUNTY PETTY SESSIONS.

This being brewster sessions, Superintendent Waghorn submitted his annual report upon the licensed houses in the divisions. All of the houses, with one exception only, had been satisfactorily conducted. This exception was the "Star Inn," Newington, the landlord of which (Maycock) was cautioned by the Bench as to how he conducted his house in the future.

 

Folkestone Herald 20 October 1894.

Local News.

Joseph Wilkins (19) and William Godding (21), soldiers, were indicted at the East Kent Sessions on Tuesday, for stealing a silver watch, value 50s., from Edward Croucher, at Newington on August 8th. Both prisoners pleaded Not Guilty. Mr. Tassell appeared for the prosecution.

The prisoners, together with another soldier, were having a “merry” at the Star, at Newington, and Edward Croucher joined them. On leaving, Croucher missed his watch. The watch was afterwards found on Wilkins, who said Godding gave it to him. Croucher would not actually identify the two prisoners.

W.H.D. Macalister, driver in the Royal Artillery, stationed at Shorncliffe, gave evidence as to the two prisoners being with him and the prosecutor.

Godding said Wilkins did not know how the watch was obtained; it was picked up off the floor after prosecutor had left the house.

Prosecutor admitted that he was not quite sober at the time.

The jury returned a verdict of Not Guilty, and prisoners were discharged.

 

Sandgate Weekly News 10 August 1895.

Local News.

The body of an unknown woman was found floating in the fish pond at Beachborough on Friday in last week. On the body being brought to the bank it was found that the legs were fastened above the knees with a piece of cord, while the head was enveloped in a shawl. The articles found on the body included a gold brooch, two purses containing £6 6s., gold earrings, two pairs of spectacles, hair brush, comb, and a small hair brush. There was nothing, however, to lead to the identification of the deceased, who was apparently about 60 years of age. An inquest was held on the body on Saturday morning at the Star Inn, Newington, the jury returning a verdict of “Suicide”, adding that there was no evidence to show the state of the deceased’s mind.

 

Folkestone Herald 3 April 1897.

Local News.

Yesterday (Friday) morning the dead body of a man unknown was found at the Lime Kiln, Newington, and presented a shocking appearance, the right leg having been almost burnt off up to the knee, and about one half of the body literally roasted. The victim is supposed to be a man who has been recently about the neighbourhood collecting herb roots, and he was seen at Newington on the afternoon of Thursday. It is supposed that on Thursday night he went to the lime kilns, either to sleep or to make some tea, and that having got between the screen and the kiln he was overpowered by the fumes and was suffocated. The body was removed as soon as practicable to the Star Inn, Newington, kept by Mr. and Mrs. Maycock, and all possible enquiries were made with the view to obtaining some clue as to identification. The Coroner for East Kent was communicated with, and the inquest was held yesterday afternoon at Mr. Maycock’s house. All the available information having been given in evidence, the jury returned a verdict to the effect that the man, name unknown, had been accidentally suffocated by the fumes from the lime kiln.

 

Hythe Reporter 11 December 1897.

Hythe County Sessions.

On Friday, before Messrs. Du Boulay and Captain Baldwin.

John Russell and Albert Hawkitt were charged with stealing half a head of pork, valued at 4s., at Newington, on December 9th.

Mr. Maycock, landlord of the Star Inn, Newington, said the two prisoners came to his house and were served with some beer in the tap room. The pork was in the tap room. A short time after the prisoners had gone, he found the pork was also gone. He afterwards gave information to the police, and they searched Postling and Stanford and the kilns at Hempsted. Subsequently they found the two prisoners at Pent Farm, Postling. The pork produced was with them. Russell told him that he had taken it.

Hawkitt said he did not know Russell had taken it until they had gone some distance along the road.

P.C. Drury corroborated the latter part of Mr. Maycock’s evidence.

Russell pleaded Guilty, and Hawkitt pleaded Not Guilty. Russell had been convicted about half a dozen times previously for various offences.

Russell was sentenced to one month hard labour. Hawkitt was discharged.

 

Folkestone Herald 21 May 1904.

Saturday, May 14th: Before Alderman T.J. Vaughan, Lieut. Col. Fynmore, and Lieut. Col. Westropp.

Henry Maycock, landlord of the Star Inn, Newington, applied for an occasional licence to sell beer at Ashley Park Fete on Whit Monday. The application was granted.

 

Folkestone Herald 28 May 1904.

Elham County Bench.

Tuesday, May 24th.

William Cox was charged on remand with being drunk and disorderly in Peene Road, Newington, on 21st May.

According to the evidence, prisoner wanted to fight a police constable, and became very violent. He had been ejected from the Star public house for using obscene language.

The case was remanded until Thursday in order that the landlord of the Star might be present.

Cox was allowed bail in his own recognisances of £5.

 

Folkestone Express 2 February 1907.

Inquest.

An inquest was held at the Star Inn, Newington by Mr. R.M. Mercer (East Kent Coroner) on Saturday afternoon, touching the death of Henry Wraight, who was found dead on St. Martin’s Plain.

Thomas Philpott deposed that he lived at 11, Military Avenue, Cheriton. The previous day he was going to work, when he saw the body of a man lying by a hedge on the Plain. Witness went up to the body, which was lying on its left side. He gave information to the police, and the body was removed to the Star Inn by P.C. Wright. Witness did not know the deceased.

P.C. Wright said he found deceased lying in the snow, with his head partly under the fence. His feet were lying at an angle of 45 deg. from the fence. Deceased was not known to witness. He thought, according to the footprints, that deceased was climbing over the fence when he fell over. He was very scantily clad. He felt the body, which was warm. He searched deceased’s clothing, but found no articles and no money.

Frederick Holt said he lived at 6, Dover Road, Folkestone. Deceased was his uncle. He was 41 years of age and single. He was formerly in the Navy, and latterly he had been working as an out-porter. Witness saw deceased last a week ago. Witness could not account for deceased being on the Plain.

Dr. A.J. Gore said he examined the body that morning. There was a bruise on the left side of the forehead, near the temple, which might have been caused by a fall. Death was due to collapse and syncope.

The jury returned a verdict in accordance with the medical testimony.

 

Folkestone Herald 2 February 1907.

Inquest.

An inquest was held by Mr. R.M. Mercer (the East Kent Coroner) at the Star Inn, Newington, on Saturday afternoon, on the body of Henry Wraight, who was found dead on St. Martin’s Plain on the previous day.

Thomas Philpott stated that he lived at 11, Military Avenue, Shorncliffe, and that on the previous day (Friday) at about one o’clock, he was going to work, when he saw the body of deceased lying by the hedge. He shouted out and went up to the body, which was lying close to the fence, with his hand through it. Deceased was on his side, as if he had slipped and fallen. His dress was not disturbed, and he had on a khaki coat, which looked worn. His trousers and boots were not good. He did not know the deceased. He informed the police, afterwards returning to the body, which was removed to the Star Inn by P.C. Wright. He was alone when he saw the body, which was lying in the snow. There was no snow on the body.

P.C. Wright deposed that he got to the body at about 1.30 on Friday. He found the deceased lying on the snow, with his head partly under the fence or railings. His feet were lying at an angle of 45 degrees from the fence. Deceased was a stranger to witness. He looked around the spot, and saw footprints, and it seemed to him that deceased had tried to climb the fence and had fallen over. What made him come to that conclusion was because no footprints were to be seen on that side of the fence. Deceased was clad in an old fawn-coloured jacket, which was very worn, and he had no underclothing on at all. He made enquiries about deceased. According to the snow, there was no-one there before, and the place was rather out of the way, being near to the Volunteers’ manoeuvring ground. He felt the body, which was warm, but he found no articles on deceased, not any money in his pockets. The man had been a sailor in the Navy for some time.

Frederick Holt stated that he lived at 6, Dover Road, Folkestone, and he knew the deceased, who was his uncle. Deceased was 41 years old, and had been in the Navy. He had lately been working as an out-porter, and was very poor. Witness did not know where the deceased, who was a single man, had lived lately. It was about a week ago when he last saw him. Deceased had not been a sober man. He had had no business, or anything to do where he was found. He (witness) did not know the place where the body was discovered. Deceased had been an out-porter at the Central Station for about eight years.

Dr. Alfred Joseph Gore, a surgeon, of Bowood House, Shorncliffe Road, Folkestone, deposed that he saw the body that (Saturday) morning. There was one bruise on the left side of the forehead, near the temple, and there was a dark clot of blood there, although there was no abrasion. He (witness) thought that it had been caused through a fall. To the left of the middle line there was another bruise, which was, possibly, caused through falling, and turning over and hitting his head on the other side. Deceased was a full-blooded man, and the vessels were diseased. The blow received was sufficient to cause unconsciousness, and the exposure to the cold, collapse, and syncope were the causes of death.

A verdict in accordance with the medical testimony was returned.

 

Folkestone Herald 11 April 1908.

Elham County Bench.

Thursday, April 9th: Before Mr. J. Du Boulay, Capt. Mansell, Messrs. F.E. Burke, and A.S. Jones.

An extension up till eleven o’clock was granted to Mr. Maycock, of the Star Inn, Newington, for a dinner today (Saturday).

 

Folkestone Herald 7 November 1908.

Elham County Bench.

Thursday, November 5th: Before Messrs. J. Du Boulay, F.E. Burke, A.M. Curties, R.J. Linton, Captain A.B. Mansell and Captain Baldwin.

Mr. Maycock, Star Inn, Newington, was granted an extension of one hour for today (Saturday).

 

Folkestone Express 25 September 1909.

Hythe County Police.

Thursday, September 23rd: Before Mr. E. Garnet Man, Capt. Mansell, and Messrs. E.T. Burke, A.S. Jones, Tudor Johnson, R.J. Linton, H.P. Jacques, and J.E. Tanare.

The Magistrates granted an extension of the licence of the Star Inn, Newington, for one hour on Saturday night, on the occasion of a harvest supper.

 

Folkestone Herald 25 September 1909.

Elham County Bench.

Thursday, September 23rd: Before Mr. E. Garnet Man, Capt. Mansell, Messrs. E.J. Burke, A.S. Jones, E. Tudor Johnson and R.J. Linton, Councillors H.P. Jacques and J.E. Tanare.

An extension was granted to Mr. Maycock, at the Star Inn, Newington, for tonight, on the occasion of a harvest supper.

 

Folkestone Herald 20 November 1909.

Elham County Bench.

Thursday, November 18th: Before Messrs. E. Garnet Man, J. Du Boulay, A.M. Curties, A.S. Jones, R.J. Linton, F.E. Burke, E.T. Johnson, and Commander A.B. Mansell.

Mr. Maycock, of the Star Inn, Newington, was granted an extension of one hour on November 22nd and December 1st.

 

Folkestone Express 15 October 1910.

Inquest.

A shocking find occurred at Newington on Wednesday morning when the body of a newly-born male child was discovered lying just within the grounds of the Vicarage, close to the fence of the private carriage drive which runs from the main road in the direction of the schools at Newington. When picked up by P.C. Walker, that officer discovered that the little mite had been terribly cut about the face, and it was evident that it had met its death in a cruel and brutal manner.

Judging from its appearance the child had lived about a day, and when found it had apparently been dead between twelve and twenty four hours. Its face was terribly cut about, and there is not the slightest doubt that someone wishing to get rid of it, had ended its brief life by using a knife or a similar instrument and disposing it in such a manner as to prevent identity of its parentage becoming known. He body at the time of the discovery was quite nude, and the only thing about it which could in any way be used as a clue was a piece of flannelette, which was saturated with blood. The spot at which the body was found is but a few yards from the main road which runs in front of the Vicarage at Newington, and is just inside the fence which borders the carriage drive to the Vicarage. The dead child was first noticed by a youth named Piddock, but no-one touched it till the arrival of the constable. There were no marks of blood on the surrounding grass of the bank where the body was lying, a fact which showed that the terrible wounds which the child’s face bore had been inflicted in some other place. The police, under Superintendent Hollands, are doing their utmost to throw light on the mystery, but their task is by no means an easy one.

The inquest on the body was held at the Star Inn, Newington, on Thursday afternoon by Mr. Rutley Mowll, the East Kent Coroner. Mr. W. Ainsbury was the foreman of the jury. The body was in a stable adjoining the inn, where it had been placed by P.C. Walker on Wednesday morning.

William James Piddock, a fifteen year old boy, in the employ of Mr. Kesby, butcher, was the first witness. He said he resided at 179, High Street, Cheriton. On Wednesday morning at 8.15 he was coming from Newington Street to the main road by way of the footpath and the Vicarage carriage drive. When he got near the bank at the end of the Vicarage meadow he noticed the body of a baby lying with its head to the fence, just on the bank. He did not examine the body at all. It was just at the entrance to the drive from the main road. It did not appear to have any clothing on the body. He told a boy named Ernest Cox of what he had seen but he did not say anything about him going for the police. It upset him a little finding the body.

P.C. Walker, of the County Constabulary, stationed at Newington, said about nine o’clock he went to the meadow in consequence of information received. The carriage drive was a private road, but it was used as a footpath from the main road to the village. He found the body of the child lying close to the fence, a few yards from the main road. For it to have been placed in the position in which it was found, the person putting it there must have gone into the drive. The body was in a nude state, and its head was lying towards the fence. There was a cut about three inches long across the face, and it extended from the left ear up to the nostril. He found a piece of flannelette saturated with blood by the side of the deceased. He removed the body to the stable at the back of the Star Inn. It was stiff and cold, and he should say rain had fallen since the body was put in the meadow. There was no blood on the ground round about to indicate that the cuts had been done there.

Dr. W.W. Nuttall, of Folkestone, and practicing in Cheriton, said he made a post mortem examination of the body the previous afternoon at the stable of the Star Inn. He found it to be that of a well-nourished child. It showed signs that it had not received proper attention at birth. There was a small amount of blood on the head, especially on the right side. Underneath the blood the skull was fractured. There were two bruises, one behind each ear, that on the right side being rather the larger. There was a cut extending from about one inch below the left ear downwards and towards the middle line of the face. It extended right through the cheek into the mouth, involving the left side of the base of the tongue, and it then went through the lower lip into the mouth. There was another cut from the right angle of the mouth going in a curved direction to within three quarters of an inch of the right nostril, it getting more superficial as it got to the nostril. The lower jaw was fractured three quarters of an inch from the angle. The lower jaw had also been cut through from just to the right of the middle line. That was a clean cut wound. The left side lower jaw was cut through, but not clean, it being in splinters. Between those two cut surfaces the portion of jaw was missing. There was also a small piece of jaw in fragments attached to the lower lip. The back of the mouth was filled with liquid blood, and the parts of the mouth at the back were severed except just at the very back. On opening the chest he found the lungs almost filled it. They were red and slightly mottled. On cutting them open air and mucous could be squeezed out. There was next to no blood in the chest. After removing the contents he tried the water test with the heart and lungs, which floated well on top of the water. The heart was normal. The stomach was pale and did not contain any food. The injuries received by the child and which he had described were the cause of the child’s death. In the place where the child had been cut there would be necessarily a large quantity of blood.

The Coroner said he understood from the Superintendent of the police that he would like to have an adjournment of that inquest, and he (Mr. Mowll) quite agreed with that. He was sorry he had to call them together again but the jury would see it was important that they should endeavour to get to the bottom of that matter. Their duty was to protect life, and at the present time they had only the evidence that the little child was found dead and badly wounded, and as to the cause of its death. They did not know whose child it was, how the injuries were inflicted, or how the child was brought to the spot. It was obvious that it was not injured in the place where it was found. He therefore proposed to adjourn that inquest until that day fortnight.

The jury and witnesses then entered into recognisances to attend the adjourned inquest at 3 o’clock on October 27th.

 

Folkestone Herald 15 October 1910.

Inquest.

Newington was startled on Wednesday by the discovery of the body of an infant child, dead and terribly injured, in the drive that leads to Newington Vicarage from the main Cheriton and Lyminge road. The discovery was made in the morning by a butcher boy, and an examination revealed that the child had evidently been placed where it was found after the injuries had been inflicted. No trace has yet been found of the parents, and as the infant was practically naked it was impossible to identify it.

The inquest was held at the Royal Oak Inn (sic), Newington, at three on Thursday afternoon, before the East Kent County Coroner, Mr. Rutley Mowll, and the evidence of Dr. Nuttall, who made the post mortem examination, showed that there were many and extensive wounds, which appeared to have been inflicted with great severity. Eventually the inquest was adjourned, at the request of the police, for a fortnight.

William James Piddock, a lad of 15 years of age, said he lived at 179, High Street, Cheriton. He was an errand boy in the employ of Mr. Kesby, butcher, Cheriton. On Wednesday, about 8.15 a.m., he was in the drive by the house of the Rev. Buckwell, Newington Vicarage. He was walking along from Newington High Street to the main road. He saw a body lying by the side of the drive on the bank, with its head to the fence. He did not go to it, but passed by on the other side. The body was within a few inches of the drive, just at the entrance to the drive from the main road to Cheriton. The body did not appear to have any clothing on. Witness reported the matter to a boy named Ernest Cox, who was a lad about nine years of age. He told this lad he could tell anybody he liked. The find rather upset witness.

P.C. C.W. Walker, of the County Constabulary, stationed at Newington, said that from information received he went to where the body was found about 9 a.m. on Wednesday, and found it situated as the last witness had described. It was only two or three yards from the main road. The body was that of a male infant child, in a nude state. It had a cut across the face, which extended from about an inch below the left ear to the nose, and was about 1½ inches deep. There was also a large bruise at the back of the right ear. A piece of flannelette, saturated with blood, lay close beside the body. He removed the body to the stable at the back of the Star Inn. The body when he found it was stiff and cold, and he should say that rain had fallen on it while it lay there. There was no blood at all on the ground to indicate that the wound had been made there; probably the body had been put there after the cut had been made. There was a public footpath along the drive, and the footpath led to Newington village.

Dr. W.W. Nuttall said he had a surgery at 69, High Street, Cheriton. On Wednesday afternoon he made a post mortem examination. He found the body was that of a well nourished male child. The child had not been properly attended to at birth. There was a small amount of blood on the head, especially on the right side, and underneath the blood the skull was fractured. There were two bruises, one behind each ear, that on the right side being rather the larger of the two. There was a cut extending from about one inch below the left ear downwards, and to the middle line of the face. It extended right through the cheek into the mouth, involving the left side of the base of the tongue, coming out through the lower lip into the mouth. There was also another cut from the right angle of the mouth, going in a curved direction to within three quarters of an inch of the right nostril, getting more superficial as it approached the nostril. The lower jaw was fractured three quarters of an inch from the angle on the right side. The lower jaw had also been cut through just a little to the right of the middle line. That was a clean wound, with no splinters or fragments. The left side of the lower jaw was also cut through, but this was not a clean cut. The part of the jaw between these two cut surfaces was missing. There was a small piece of jaw in fragments attached to the lower lip. The back of the mouth was filled with liquid blood, and the parts at the back of the mouth were severed, except at the very back. On opening the chest he found that the lungs almost filled the chest. The lungs were red, and slightly mottled. Air could be squeezed out. On applying the hydrostatic test the heart and lungs floated well on top of the water, thus proving that the child had lived. The other organs of the body were normal. There was no food in the stomach, but there were indications of food in the intestines. Death was due to the injuries received. At whatever spot the child was cut and the injuries inflicted there would necessarily be a large quantity of blood.

At the conclusion of the Doctor’s evidence the Coroner said: I understand from the Superintendent of Police that he would like to have an adjournment of this inquest. I quite agree with that. I am sorry that I shall have to call you together again, but you see that it is important that we should endeavour to get to the bottom of this matter. Our duty is to protect life, and at the moment we have only the evidence that this little child was found dead, badly wounded, and the doctor’s evidence as to the cause of death. We do not know whose child it was, nor how these injuries came to be inflicted, nor how it was brought to this spot. It is obvious that the child was not injured at the place where it was found, owing to the absence of any blood on the ground. Therefore I propose to adjourn this inquest until today fortnight, Thursday, October 27th.

The jury and witnesses were then bound over to appear at the adjourned inquest, and before the conclusion of the proceedings the Coroner told the jury that it was their duty to examine into the affair most minutely, and asked them to at once communicate with the Superintendent of Police if they heard of anything that might throw any light on the affair.

 

Folkestone Express 22 October 1910.

Local News.

The police have so far been unable to trace the parentage of the child whose body was found in the Vicarage drive last week, and who died through terrible cuts it had sustained about the face and mouth.

 

Folkestone Express 29 October 1910.

Inquest.

The adjourned inquest on the newly born male child which was found terribly mutilated about the face on Wednesday, October 12th, in the Vicarage grounds at Newington, was held on Thursday afternoon at the Star Inn, Newington. No further evidence could be given as to its identity, and so far the whole matter remains a mystery, notwithstanding tremendous efforts made by the police to find some trace of the parentage of the child. The jury could only return a verdict of “Wilful murder against some person or persons unknown”, and this they did. Although the inquest is closed the police will not slacken their efforts in the least to solve what undoubtedly was a brutal murder. There was very little additional evidence to come before the East Kent Coroner (Mr. Rutley Mowll), who simply re-called Dr. Nuttall.

The Coroner said he wanted to ask him as to the deductions which he drew from the evidence he gave on the last occasion. First of all was he of opinion the child breathed?

Dr. Nuttall: Yes.

That is to say that it was born alive? – Yes.

Secondly, in your opinion, it had independent circulation? – Yes.

The Coroner then explained that the inquest was adjourned in order that the police might make their enquiries in regard to whose child it was, and the circumstances in which it came to be placed in that particular spot. He understood that the police had made full enquiries.

Supt. Hollands: Yes, and special enquiries.

The Coroner: And the police have tried to find out more about the case, but they have not been successful?

Supt. Hollands: We have so far been unsuccessful and there is no light on it at all.

The Coroner, in summing up, said it must be for the jury a source of much regret that the police enquiries had not succeeded in clearing up the mystery. Enquiries had been made under the supervision of Supt. Hollands, and he thought they might rest assured that very full and careful enquiries had been made into the matter. Obviously, in the very nature of things, the person who placed that body in the position in which it was found did not want anything more to be known of the facts. They had to find out how that child came to its death. He was sure they all felt very much indebted to the doctor for the very lucid evidence he gave at the first hearing, and they would remember how he described the cuts on the child’s face. The Coroner then read the evidence respecting the cuts, and continuing he said that those cuts were quite sufficient to call attention to the fact that the child was brutally mutilated. Some person, unfortunately unknown, took that child and by means of a knife or very sharp instrument severely cut and gashed the poor little babe’s face with it. The child must have had a considerable loss of blood, and no doubt it died from heart failure consequent upon the injuries received. Who the person was they did not know. All they knew was that on October 12th at a quarter past eight in the morning the lad Piddock found the child in the grounds of Newington Vicarage. It was naked and there was no appearance of blood on the ground, which was a clear indication that the child had not been murdered there, but its body was brought there and thrown there either by the murderer or some person on his or her behalf in order to get it away from the probable scene of the murder. They must remember it was a very serious matter to take a life, even the life of a child who had only just come into the world, and was nothing short of murder. They all could only regret that there were people heartless enough to do an act of that sort, and they still more regretted that they had not been able to have the person traced. There was an old saying that truth would out and it may be that some day the person who committed the foul deed would be brought to light. They had the satisfaction of knowing on their part they had done their best to enable the matter to be brought to light by adjourning the inquest. They had given opportunity for further inquiries, and they hoped that they would be ultimately successful.

The jury quickly returned a verdict of “Wilful murder against some person or persons unknown”, and the inquiry closed.

 

Folkestone Herald 29 October 1910.

Inquest.

The adjourned inquest on the body of the newly born baby, found at Newington on the 12th October, was conducted by the East Kent Coroner (Mr. Rutley Mowll), at the Star Inn, Newington, on Thursday.

The Coroner stated that he wanted to ask Dr. Nuttall a few questions. First of all, was he of opinion that this child breathed?

Witness: Yes.

That is to say, the child was born alive? – Yes.

In your opinion did it have an independent circulation? – I believe it did.

The Coroner said that that inquiry was adjourned in order that the police might make inquiries in regard to the persons whose child that was, and the circumstances under which it came to be put where it was found. Had inquiries been made?

Superintendent Hollands: Yes.

The Coroner: There have been full inquiries and considerable efforts have been made by the police in trying to find out more about the case? – Yes.

You have not been successful? – No. No light has been thrown on it at all.

The Coroner said it must be to the jury, as it was to him, a source of much regret that the inquiries had not succeeded in clearing up the mystery. They had been made under the direction of Superintendent Hollands, and he thought that they might rest assured that very full and careful inquiries had been made into that matter. Obviously from the very nature of things, the person who placed the body in the position in which it was found did not want anything more to be known of the facts. He wanted to draw their attention to the undoubted fact that that child was brutally mutilated. That some person, unfortunately unknown, took that child, and by means of a knife, or some other sharp instrument, so severely cut and gashed that little baby’s face that it had a considerable loss of blood, and no doubt died from heart failure, consequent upon the injuries. Who that person was they did not know. Where it took place they did not know, but Mr. Mowll pointed out the fact that there was no blood where the child was found was a clear indication that the child had not been murdered there. It was a very simple case, but they must remember that that was a very serious matter, the taking of life, even of a little life that had only just come into the world. It was, as they knew, nothing short of murder, the most serious offence known to the law. They all of them only regretted that there were people heartless enough to go and do a deed of that sort, and only regretted that they had not been able to have the person traced.

A verdict of “Wilful murder against some person or persons unknown” was returned.

 

Folkestone Herald 23 September 1911.

Elham County Bench.

Thursday, September 21st: Before Messrs. E. Garnet Man, A.S. Jones, E. Tudor Johnson, A.M. Curties, and F.E. Burke.

Mr. Maycock, of the Star Inn, Newington, was granted an occasional licence for October 6th.

 

Folkestone Herald 18 November 1911.

Elham County Bench.

Thursday, November 16th: Before Messrs. E. Garnet Man, A.S. Jones, R.J. Linton, A.M. Curties, G.W. Tester, F.E. Burke, H. Lee, Alderman J. Quested, Commander A.B. Mansell, and Councillor J. Maltby.

Mr. Maycock, of the Star Inn, Newington, was granted one hour’s extension for November 25th, on the occasion of a dinner.

 

Folkestone Herald 1 November 1913.

Elham County Bench.

Thursday, October 30th: Before Mr. E. Garnet Man, Sir Clarence Smith, Mr. A.M. Curties, Mr. F.E. Burke, Mr. R.J. Linton, Alderman J.E. Quested, Mr. W.G. Tester, and Councillor H.P. Jacques.

Mr. Maycock, of the Star Inn, Newington, was granted an hour’s extension of licence on November 12th for a dinner.

 

Folkestone Herald 30 May 1914.

Elham County Bench.

Monday, May 25th: Before Councillor J.H.W. Huntley.

Charles Allard, 65, was charged with stealing 23s., the money of Mrs. Lily Laws, of Cheriton.

Detective Constable Kenward stated that at 7.30 the previous morning he received the accused in custody at Sittingbourne police station, where he had been detained. When charged he made no reply, but in the train on the way to Seabrook police station Allard remarked “I suppose I shall get a long stretch for this”. Witness replied “I do not know”. Accused then said “I hope my people won’t make it too hard for me, and I’ll never trouble them again. I couldn’t have spent all the money. Someone must have run through my pockets”.

The Magistrate remanded the prisoner until the following day.

Tuesday, May 26th: Before Councillor H.P. Jacques and Councillor J.H.W. Huntley.

Charles Allard appeared on remand, charged with stealing 23s., the money of Mrs. Lily Laws, of Cheriton.

Prosecutrix stated that accused was her step-father, and his wife and himself had been living at her house. In a cupboard was generally kept some money in a tin box (produced). She saw the box on May 20th, when it contained 23s. (one half sovereign and 13s. in silver) On Thursday, at 8.30 a.m., her mother pointed out that the box was under the sink in the scullery and was empty. Accused was in the house all night, and left at about 6.30 in the morning.

Mr. Albert Charles Maycock, licensee of the Star Inn, Newington, said he knew the accused, who came to his house between 6.30 and 7 on Thursday morning and asked for a pint of beer, tendering a half sovereign in payment. Accused asked what time the next train to Canterbury went from Lyminge, and mentioned that he was going on to Sittingbourne.

Detective Constable Kenward repeated the evidence of arrest.

Prisoner elected to be summarily dealt with, and pleaded Guilty. He said he was coming back to pay the money, but somebody must have taken it. He now intended to pay it back some day.

There were ten previous convictions against prisoner, chiefly for theft.

The Chairman said it was a very hard robbery, and Allard richly deserved more than the Bench was going to give him, which would be three months imprisonment with hard labour.

Accused: Thank you.

 

Folkestone Express 2 October 1915.

Elham County Bench.

Thursday, September 30th: Before Garnet Man Esq., Sir Clarence Smith, J.H. Maltby Esq., A.S. Jones Esq., and E.J. Bishop Esq.

Private J.R. Horncastle (C.E.F.), summoned for being drunk in the Star Inn, Newington, on September 15th, was fined 10/-.

The defendant said he had been admonished by the military authorities.

A military Sergeant said the case was dismissed.

The Chairman: Why? Because he was not drunk enough?

The Witness: I don’t know, sir. I was not there.

It was explained that inquiries were being made as to why the case was dismissed.

Albert Charles Maycock, of the Star Inn, Newington, was summoned for permitting drunkenness on his premises. Mr. G.W. Haines appeared for the defence. This was a sequel to the last case.

The facts alleged by the prosecution having been stated, defendant said he had been in the house eight years. It had been in the family for 65 years, his father and grandfather having held the licence. He declared that time after time he ordered Horncastle to leave, but he refused. On no occasion was he served in the house. When found by the police he (defendant) did not know the man had come back. He asked the Military Police to come and look round the premises.

The Bench dismissed the case, and a summons for “selling” was withdrawn.

 

Folkestone Herald 2 October 1915.

Elham County Bench.

Thursday, September 30th: Before Mr. E. Garnet Man, Mr. A.S. Jones, Mr. E.J. Bishop, Sir Clarence Smith, Mr. J.H. Maltby, and Mr. A.N. Watney.

Albert C. Maycock, the landlord of the Star Inn, Newington, was summoned for permitting drunkenness on his licensed premises on the 15th September. Mr. G.W. Haines appeared for the defendant, who pleaded Not Guilty.

After lengthy, conflicting evidence the Bench dismissed the summons.

Pte. Horncastle, of the 12th Reserve Canadian Batt., who had been ejected three times by Mr. Maycock, and who was ultimately ejected by P.C. Wellard and Corpl. J. Tulloch, was fined 10s. It was stated that defendant had been tried by a Court Martial, but it being his first offence for drunkenness, was only severely reprimanded by his Commanding Officer.

 

Folkestone Express 22 July 1916.

Elham County Bench.

Thursday, July 20th: Before E. Garnet Man, A.S. Jones, J.E. Quested, H. Strahan, C.E. Mumford, E.J. Bishop, and J.H. Maltby Esqs.

William Coveney, of High Street, Cheriton, was summoned for supplying beer to soldiers, contrary to the Order.

P.C. Clow saw the defendant leave the Star, Newington, on July 2nd with a sack on his back. He watched, and then saw a soldier with two bottles of beer. Subsequently a soldier came up and said “Yes, that is the man who bought the beer. We gave him 2/-“.

Mr. Douglas De Wet (who appeared for the defence): The defendant was an old resident of Cheriton. A soldier did not tell witness that the beer was given to him. Witness called at the Star and was informed that the defendant came every evening and took away two bottles of beer.

Corporal C. Baker, Canadian Military Police, said one of the soldiers concerned was an escaped prisoner of war, having just returned from Germany.

Defendant, in the witness box, said he had lived in Cheriton over thirty years. He was working at Dibgate, and was in the habit of calling in the Star Inn with a Mr. Cook every evening. They always, if they could, took four bottles of beer to last them until the next evening. On the day in question he took four bottles for Mr. Cook and himself. He used to hide up the bottles so that they should not have the trouble of carrying them home, a considerable distance away. As he was going along two soldiers spoke to him, but he neither sold nor did he give to them any beer. Witness then hid the beer, but later found only two bottles instead of four.

By the Bench: The soldiers must have seen him hide the four bottles.

Alfred Cook, of Whitby Road, Cheriton, also spoke to four bottles being hidden and only two being found.

The Chairman pointed out that the defendant said he left the beer in the grass, while the witness said he found two bottles in the potatoes.

Witness: Well, we always knew where to find them. (Laughter)

Mr. De Wet said the men had a good many hiding places.

In reply to the Chairman, witness said the four bottles of beer were never hidden together.

Mr. De Wet remarked, amid laughter, that in this case it was fortunate all the four bottles were not hidden together.

The barman at the Star Inn spoke to defendant’s habit of taking away four bottles of beer each evening.

A Lance-Corporal, called by the Bench, said to the best of his knowledge the beer was given to his chum by a civilian, presumably on account of his chum having been an escaped prisoner of war from Germany. They had the beer, and unfortunately they ran into the Military Police. The reason witness did not have the bottles was that his tunic was too tight. (Laughter) They got the beer, but had no time to drink it. His chum gave a considerable amount of money away that evening, he being in a generous state of mind, but to his (witness’s) knowledge he did not give 2/- to the defendant for the beer.

The defendant was fined £5, it being explained that the maximum penalty was £100, or six months’ imprisonment. A month was allowed for payment.

 

Folkestone Herald 22 July 1916.

Elham County Bench.

Thursday, July 20th: Before Mr. E. Garnet Man, Mr. A.S. Jones, Mr. J.E. Quested, Mr. E.J. Bishop, Mr. J.H. Maltby, Mr. C. Ed. Mumford, and Mr. H. Strahan.

William Coveney, labourer, of High Street, Cheriton, was summoned for unlawfully supplying beer to soldiers on July 2nd. Defendant, who was represented by Mr. De Wet, pleaded Not Guilty.

P.C. Clow, and Corporal Baker, of the Canadian Military Police, gave evidence.

Defendant stated that, in accordance with his custom, he bought the beer at the Star, Newington, and placed two bottles for a fellow workman named Cook in a part of his allotment for consumption next day. At different times they had missed the bottles, and on this occasion he found that two bottles had been stolen.

Alfred Cook and Charles Southern, barman at the Star Inn, corroborated.

Defendant was fined £5, being allowed a month to pay.

 

Folkestone Express 27 July 1918.

Local News.

During a thunderstorm on Saturday a chimney stack was demolished at the Star Inn, Newington. The interior of one of the lower rooms was also much damaged. Fortunately the people in the house escaped injury.

 

Folkestone Express 9 November 1918.

Inquest.

On Tuesday the County Coroner, Mr. Rutley Mowll, held an inquest at the Star Inn, Newington, relative to the tragic death of Mrs. Emily Ruck, of Stelling Minnis, who, while driving in Newington on Friday last, was thrown from her pony trap, and, falling beneath the wheels of a truck drawn by a traction engine, was crushed to death.

The evidence went to show that the deceased lady apparently pulled the near rein rather tightly, with the result that the pony swerved, and the wheel of the trap going on to the bank, the vehicle was overturned. The deceased was thrown out, and a wheel of the last truck passed over her head, death being instantaneous.

The jury returned a verdict of “Death from Misadventure”, and exonerated the driver of the traction engine from all blame.

 

Folkestone Herald 9 November 1918.

Inquest.

On Tuesday Mr. Rutley Mowll (East Kent Coroner) held an inquest at the Star Inn, Newington, relative to the death of Mrs. Emily Ruck, aged 47, of Stelling, who met with a fatal accident on the previous Friday. Mr. Frederic J. Hall watched the case on behalf of the owners of the traction engine (Messrs. Chittenden and and Simmons, of Maidstone).

George Walter Ruck, wood dealer, of Court Hope Farm, Stelling, identified the body as that of his wife. On Friday about 7 a.m. she left for Folkestone with a pony and four wheeled wagon containing vegetables and wood. She was accustomed to driving, and had driven this particular animal for some twelve months. It was a quiet pony and not inclined to shy. His wife had good sight and hearing.

Pte. Hawkes, C.M.P., stationed at Risborough Barracks, stated that he was on duty outside the Star Inn on Friday. He saw the deceased driving a pony and light van on the left side as close to the bank as she could get, proceeding in the direction of Ashford. About a hundred yards from where he was standing a traction engine drawing three trucks was approaching towards Cheriton. Deceased had passed the engine and two trucks, when he saw the rear end of the van tip up. He at once rushed forward and saw the woman lying with her head crushed. Death had apparently been instantaneous. The van was completely turned over and the pony was lying on its side. He examined the truck, and saw a mark near the rear, as though it had been scraped by the van.

The Coroner: Did the traction engine have room to pass? – I did not notice particularly, but the horse and van having passed the engine and two trucks, I conclude there was room to pass the third truck. The height of the engine obscured my view.

A juror: How fast was the engine travelling? – I do not know, for I am no judge of the speed of engines or motors. I should say, however, six or seven miles an hour.

Fred. Fox, Salisbury Road, Cheriton, said he was an engine driver in the employ of Mr. Nichols. On Friday about 12.40 he was driving in the direction of Cheriton, following another engine and three trucks. The traction engines and “trains” had nothing to do with each other, belonging to different owners. He was travelling at a distance of about 150 yards behind and saw the van go over. He pulled up at once and rushed to the spot. He found that the wheel of a truck had gone over the woman’s head. He was of opinion that it was the last truck. There was plenty of room for her to pass, and he could not say why she ran up on the bank. So far as he could see the horse did not take fright.

P.C. J.C. Yates said the width of the road was 22ft., and there were no footpaths. The off hind wheel of the rear truck was 11ft. 6 ins. from the bank, and the rear wheel 5ft. 4ins. from the near side of the bank. The width of the truck was 7ft. The distance from where the truck pulled up to where the body lay was 12 feet. The width of the van which deceased was driving was 4ft. 9ins. from hub to hub. There appeared to have been plenty of room for the van to pass. The driver of the engine stated that he had a load of 21 tons behind him, and that he pulled slightly to the crown of the road because there was another horse and van standing in front of him at the inn.

Dr. J.J. Wallace, who happened to be on the road at the time, confirmed the evidence of the military policeman and other witnesses. The deceased woman’s head was lying in the track of the wheel completely crushed. There was obviously plenty of room for her to pass, and the engine pulled up very quickly indeed.

Thomas Henry Shavill, of London Road, Wrotham, stated that he was proceeding to Cheriton when he saw the deceased approaching him. He was driving the engine. He drew to the right side of the road as the pony and cart passed him, and deceased passed the engine and second truck all right. It was his invariable custom to look back while any other vehicle passed him on the road, and he did so on this occasion. He noticed that the small van began to mount the bank. He shut off steam, and put the reversing lever at neutral, and ran back, when he saw that the hind wheel had passed over deceased’s head.

The Coroner: Can you account for the van going on to the bank in any way? – The woman was looking over on to my trucks and holding the near rein rather tight, and that would cause the pony to go too near the bank.

The foreman: The van was a light one? – Yes, I lifted it right over myself.

The Coroner, in summing up, said it was clear that there was plenty of room for the poor woman to have passed. She evidently had her mind on what she was passing at the time, and holding the left rein too tight. The pony naturally went too close, and the light van was overturned.

The jury returned a verdict of “Accidental Death” and exonerated the driver of the traction engine from all blame.

The Coroner expressed the sympathy of the jury and himself with the husband, and Mr. Hall tendered the sincere sympathy of the owners of the traction engine.

 

Folkestone Express 24 June 1922.

Elham Petty Sessions.

At the fortnightly sitting of the Elham Petty Sessional Court on Thursday in last week, Dr. W. Tyson presided on the Bench.

Albert Charles Maycock, of the Star Inn, Newington, was summoned for selling whisky which had been adulterated.

Evidence was given that a pint of whisky was found on analysis to be 39.84 degrees under proof.

Mrs. Maycock, wife of defendant, explained how the matter occurred, and the Bench decided that there had been an error of judgement, and fined defendant only 5s., also expressing the opinion that there should be no opposition to the renewal of the licence.

 

Folkestone Herald 13 March 1926.

Obituary.

We regret to announce the death on Tuesday, at the Star Inn, Newington, of the proprietor, Mr. Alfred Charles Maycock. The deceased, who was the youngest son of Mr. H. Maycock, the original proprietor (sic), was in his 47th year. Before taking over the Star he was fourteen years billiard marker at the Radnor Club, and on his relinquishing the position he was presented by members of the Club with an inscribed watch and illuminated address in recognition of his faithful service. He leaves a widow and a son and daughter.

 

Folkestone Express 27 March 1926.

Local News.

The funeral of the late Mr. A.C. Maycock, of the Star Inn, Newington, took place at the Newington Churchyard on Friday.

 

Folkestone Express 9 November 1935.

Local News.

The Folkestone Magistrates on Tuesday granted a protection order in respect of the transfer of the licence of the Star Inn, Newington, from the present licensee, Mr. Nodder, to Mr. J. Farrell, 123, Lavender Hill, Battersea, a former steward employed on the vessels of the Red Star Line.

 

Folkestone Herald 9 November 1935.

Local News.

Folkestone Magistrates on Tuesday granted a Protection Order to Mr. J. Farrell, of Lavender Hill, Battersea, formerly a steward with the Red Star Line, in respect of the Star Inn, Newington.

 

Folkestone Herald 28 June 1941.

Local News.

A deal in coal belonging to the Secretary of State for War cost a Folkestone licensee a fine of £20 with three guineas costs when he pleaded Guilty at the Folkestone Petty Sessions on Tuesday to receiving coal which had been stolen.

The defendant was John Farrell, licensee of the Star Inn, Newington. Two other men, Thomas Martin Wilcocks, of Phillip Road, Cheriton, and Ernest E. Kendall, of Royal Military Avenue, Cheriton, were charged with stealing 3 tons 7 cwts. of coal, valued £10 14s. 6d., belonging to the Secretary of State for War. They were each fined £3. The case against Wilcocks and Kendall was heard first.

Mr. B.H. Bonniface, who prosecuted in each case, said he put the case against Wilcocks and Kendall before the Magistrates as being a deliberate theft. Kendall was employed as a barrack labourer and part of his duty was to check in deliveries of coal. The other defendant was in the employ of a contractor and he had been taking delivery of coal arriving at Shorncliffe Station. On June 16th there was a load of coal containing 10 tons 9 cwts. at Shorncliffe Station and Wilcocks was instructed to cart it away. It was collected but in fact there was a shortage. On the following day Wilcocks received instructions to collect some more coal. With him was a man named McMeakin. On arriving at the place where the coal was to be unloaded there was some delay because Kendall, who had the keys, was not there. Kendall arrived a little later and opened the shed. McMeakin delivered his coal but when he came away he noticed that Wilcocks had left with his lorry full of coal. Later that day Major Rowe went to the Star Inn at Newington, and there found a considerable quantity of coal, which was subsequently identified and collected. It weighed three tons and seven cwts. Further enquiries were made and defendants were interviewed. Wilcocks said that he had delivered the coal to the Star Inn, but he had taken it there on instructions from Kendall, adding “I have got a chit here for it”.

Charles J. Rodwell, 12 Joyes Road, a barrack labourer, said Wilcocks was a driver employed by a local contractor. On June 16th a truck containing over 10 tons was at Shorncliffe Station and he instructed Wilcocks to collect the coal and deliver it. On the following day he gave Wilcocks further instructions to carry on and finish the delivery.

Frederick W. Wiltshire, a barrack warden, said the form produced and signed by Kendall showed that 10 tons 9 cwts. had been delivered to him. On June 17th he saw a quantity of coal at the Star Inn, Newington. He had it removed and weighed.

Major G.R. Rowe said on June 17th he went to the Star Inn, Newington, and saw a large quantity of coal. It was Northumberland coal and identical to that being supplied to his department.

William McMeakin, of Woodfield Close, Cheriton, said on June 17th he went to Shorncliffe Station to load coal. He took the coal to its destination but had to wait for Kendall to arrive with the key. He unloaded his coal in a shed. When witness went in Wilcocks was outside with a load but when he came out five minutes later Wilcocks was not there.

Det Const. Walsh said on June 18th he saw Wilcocks and told him the nature of his enquiries. Wilcocks said “I delivered a load of coal to the Star Inn yesterday, but I took it there on instructions from Kendall. I have got a chit”. He then produced a delivery note which showed that there were three tons of coal to be delivered at the Star Inn. It was signed by Kendall on behalf of Major Rowe. Witness later saw Kendall, who said “I will tell you the truth. It was Wilcocks’s idea and he took the money”. On the way to the Police Station with Kendall he saw Wilcocks and told him that he would be taken to the Police Station. He said “Have you got Kendall?” Later, at the police Station, Kendall asked to make a statement.

Mr. Bonniface read the statement in which Kendall said that Wilcocks asked him if he could arrange for a load of coal, either three or four tons, to go to the, Star Inn. He (Kendall) replied that it was a bit risky, and Kendall then alleged that Wilcocks said "If you make out a chit for it, it will cover me”. Kendall said he would do so. The statement went on, said Mr. Bonniface, “I wrote out the chit for the Star Inn and gave it to Wilcocks. Later I went to the Star Inn and saw Wilcocks unloading it. I helped him to unload. Before I left Wilcocks gave me £1 10s. I knew this money was for the coal we had taken to the Star Inn. I later put the money on a horse”.

Det. Const. Walsh said Wilcocks said “I gave my share of the money to my wife”. When charged Kendall said “I am sorry that it happened. I realise what a fool I have been”.

Addressing the Magistrates, Wilcocks said he was very sorry it had happened. Kendall said he felt thoroughly ashamed of himself. He had just received his calling-up papers for the R.A.F.

The Magistrates then heard the case against Farrell, who was charged with receiving 3 tons 7 cwts. of coal, well knowing at the time that it had been stolen.

Mr. G.P. Medlicott, who appeared for Farrell, said he was prepared to plead Guilty in respect of two tons.

Mr. Bonniface said it made no difference as far as he was concerned.

Evidence was given by witnesses appearing in the case against the other two defendants.

Major Rowe said on June 17th he went to the Star Inn, Newington, and saw a quantity of coal there. He spoke to defendant and asked him where he had obtained the coal. He replied that it was delivered by a man who had come on a lorry and had a chit stamped at the back and signed for by a major.

By Mr. Medlicott: The coal was in a fairly open place and defendant gave every possible explanation.

Det. Const. Walsh said he saw Farrell and asked him where obtained the coal. He replied “A man came with a lorry and delivered it and I gave him £3”. After being told that he would be charged with receiving the coal defendant said “I am sorry, is necessary for us to go as far this?”

Replying to Mr. Medlicott, witness said Farrell made no attempt to conceal anything.

Mr. Medlicott said defendant was a man of excellent character. He had been a licensee for seven years and there was no stain upon his character. Defendant was in the Merchant Navy from the time he was 17 to 40, except during the last war when he was with the R.N.V.R.
When he was offered the coal defendant thought there were only two tons and he paid £3 for it. There was no concealment by defendant. He could not have been more frank. It was difficult to know why a man should do such a thing. Defendant must have known there was something “fishy” about it, but why he did it he (Mr. Medlicott) did not suppose defendant could say. Of course he ought to have been more careful. He ought to have had nothing to do with it before finding out from where the coal had come.

Chief Inspector W. Hollands said Wilcocks was a married man with four children. He served in the last war with the Middlesex Regiment. There was nothing against him. Kendall was a local lad. He served with the Queen’s Royal Regiment for eight years. He was also married. On September 21st, 1937, at that Court, he had been bound over for embezzlement. He had four children.

After retiring, the Mayor (Alderman J.C. Clark), presiding with Alderman W. Hollands and Mr. P. Fuller, announced that Farrell would be fined £20 with three guineas costs, and Wilcocks and Kendall would be each fined £3 or one month’s imprisonment. The Bench allowed Wilcocks and Kendall a fortnight to pay their fines.

 

Folkestone Herald 2 August 1941.

Local News.

At the Folkestone Police Court on Tuesday the Magistrates granted a protection order to Mr. W.G. Hoare, of New Romney, in respect of the Star Inn, Newington. The outgoing tenant was Mr. J.B. Farrell.

 

Folkestone Herald 11 June 1949.

Local News.

At Folkestone Magistrates Court on Wednesday last week an application in respect of the Star Inn, Newington, for permission to carry out certain alterations to the premises was made. Plans for interior alterations were approved, but the magistrates decided to inspect the site of a proposed outdoor convenience.

 

Folkestone Herald 7 July 1951.

Local News.

Seven Folkestone public houses were granted an extension of licence on weekdays until 11 p.m. and on Sundays to 10.30 p.m. until September 30th at Folkestone Magistrates’ Court yesterday.

Mr. W.J. Mason, appearing for the applicants, said a similar application had been granted to a number of hotels for the summer season and Festival of Britain. At Eastbourne 44 applications of the same kind had been granted and 115 at Hastings. The extension had been granted to all those who desired it in the other two towns.

The application was granted in respect of the Star Inn, Bouverie Hotel, Shakespeare Hotel, Guildhall Hotel, Prince Albert Hotel, Globe Inn, and George Inn.

 

Folkestone Herald 28 February 1959.

Local News.

Edwin A. Morris, formerly carrying on business st the Star Inn, Newington, appeared for his adjourned public examination at Canterbury Bankruptcy Court on Tuesday. His statement of affairs had shown liabilities amounting to £2,285 16/2 and a deficiency of £320 8/-.

He was formerly at the Bull’s Head Hotel, Margate, and had attributed his failure to carrying on both houses at the same time for some months at a quiet time of the year with incidental heavy travelling expenses. He had been ordered in November to file a statement showing how he had disposed of a sum of £266.

The Official Receiver (Mr. T.A. Tuck) said he had received the statement that morning. It showed items totalling £175, the rest being payments of pressing trade accounts, details of which he could not remember. Mr. Tuck said it was a little unsatisfactory, but he did not suppose he would get a better statement.

Asked if he had delivered up all his assets, Morris replied “Everything except my overcoat”.

The public examination was closed.

 

Folkestone Gazette 4 November 1959.

Townsman’s Diary.

Three local inn signs will be displayed in Brussels shortly. Perhaps you may have noticed that the colourful sign of your favourite hostelry has disappeared recently and been replaced with a notice such as is pictured on this page. What’s behind their disappearance? Well, the enterprising House of Whitbread are taking part in an exhibition one of the big stores in the Belgian capital is staging from November 19th to January 1st. The accent will be on the British way of life and many British goods will be on sale. Included in the exhibition are signs from Kent inns. Whitbreads are displaying the signs at their prefabricated public house. From Folkestone the brewers have taken the signs of the British Lion on Folkestone’s old Bayle, the Lifeboat Inn, North Street, and The Star, Newington. The signs were on their way to Brussels yesterday.

 

Folkestone Gazette 9 August 1961.

Local News.

A safe gang got away with over £500, wines and spirits worth £60, and 6,000 cigarettes from the Star Inn, Newington, on Friday night. They forced a back door and carried the 2 cwt. Safe from a small room adjoining the bars to a waiting vehicle. Then they helped themselves to cigarettes and 75 bottles of wines and spirits without disturbing the landlord and his family. The safe, its back ripped open, was found near Wingham the following day. “There was £580 in the safe, but all the thieves left behind was £17 in silver, £11 10/3 worth of threepenny pieces and some cheques”, said the landlord.

 

Folkestone Gazette 23 August 1961.

Local News.

Alleged to have taken part in a safe robbery at a public house at Newington on August 4th, Desmond John Penrose, aged 33, painter and decorator, of no fixed address, was at Folkestone Magistrates’ Court on Friday sent for trial at West Kent Quarter Sessions on September 4th. He was charged with breaking into the Star Inn and stealing a safe containing money, and other articles to the total value of about £750. The property included jewellery, bottles of wines and spirits, 6,000 cigarettes, a radio set and £594 12/4 in cash.

Penrose admitted to the Court “I was concerned in the theft”.

Mr. P.B. Langford, prosecuting, said Penrose told police that he was involved in the offence with two other men who had not been apprehended. The prosecution was prepared to accept his story that he waited outside the inn in a car keeping watch for the others.

Mr. Geoffrey Edward Cross, licensee of the Star Inn, said at 12.15 a.m. on August 4th he made sure all exterior doors and windows at the premises were locked and bolted. When he went downstairs at 6.15 a.m. he found that the door of the sun lounge had been forced, and that property worth about £750 was missing.

D. Inspector Packman said at 10.05 p.m. on August 7th he arrested Penrose in Hythe in connection with another mater. The following day he admitted being concerned in the offence at Newington, stating “I can take you to where some of the property is hidden but I cannot tell you where it is”. That evening he was driven in a police car along roads in the area of Canterbury, Adisham, Bekesbourne and Wingham. While on a road between Wingham and Barham he stated “There’s the place”, indicating a disused quarry. Police made a search and found two pillowcases containing seven bottles of wine and seven of spirits. During the search Penrose told him “I never break. I drove the car and left them to do the job while I drove round, and returned when they were ready. We then drove and they dumped the safe while I kept the car on the move. Then we drove here as it was getting light, and I remained here while they hid the stuff you have found. I was with them and had some of the money so it’s no good me saying I don’t know, anything about it”. When charged with the offence, Penrose replied “If that is the money supposed to have gone I did not have my full share.” Later he said “I had £100 in all”.

 

Folkestone Herald 26 August 1961.

Local News.

Desmond John Penrose, 33, painter and decorator, of no fixed address, was committed for trial at West Kent Quarter Sessions when he appeared on remand at Folkestone on Tuesday, charged with breaking into the Star Inn, Newington, and stealing a safe containing money and other articles, to the value of about £750. The property included jewellery, bottles of wines and spirits, 6,000 cigarettes, a radio set and £594 12/4 in cash.

Accused first appeared before the Magistrates on August 9th when evidence of arrest was given by D. Inspector I. Packman. He said he saw accused at the rear of the Ritz Cinema, Hythe, at 10.05 p.m. on August 7th and took him to Folkestone police station.

At the resumed hearing, Mr. P.B. Langford, prosecuting, said Penrose told police that he was involved in the offence with two other men who had not been apprehended. The prosecution was prepared to accept his story that he waited outside the inn in a car, keeping watch for the others.

Mr. Geoffrey Edward Cross, licensee of the Star Inn, Newington, said at 12.15 a.m. on August 4th he made sure all exterior doors and windows at the premises were locked and bolted. He got up at 6.15 a.m. and found the door of the sun lounge forced, and property worth about £750 was missing.

D. Inspector Packman said Penrose was driven in a police car along roads in the area of Canterbury, Adisham, Bekesbourne and Wingham. While on a road between Wingham and Barham, Penrose stated “That’s the place”, indicating a disused quarry. Police searched the place and found two pillowcases containing seven bottles of wine and seven of spirits. During the search Penrose told him “I never break. I drove the car and left them to do the job while I drove round and returned when they were ready. We then drove and they dumped the safe while I kept the car on the move. Then we drove here as it was getting light, and I remained here while they hid the stuff you have found. I was with them and had some of the money, so it’s no good me saying I don’t know anything about it”. When charged with the offence, Penrose replied “If that is the money supposed to have gone I did not have my full share”. Later he said “I had £100 in all”.

 

Folkestone Gazette 13 September 1961.

Local News.

For his part in the raid on the Star Inn, Newington, Folkestone, on August 4th, when property and money worth £750 were stolen, Desmond J. Penrose (33), painter, of no fixed address, was jailed for five years at the West Kent Quarter Sessions at Maidstone. Penrose, a man with four findings of guilt and seven previous convictions, who asked for other offences to be considered, pleaded Guilty to breaking in and stealing about 78 bottles of wines and spirits, 6,000 cigarettes, 302 cigars, jewellery, etc., and about £594, total value £750.

Mr. C. Nichols, prosecuting, outlined the details, and said that while Penrose was at Folkestone police atation about another matter, he was asked about the offence and his part in it. He was told that certain property had been recovered, and he then said he would take the police to where some of the property was hidden. He went with the police to a quarry on the Barham – Wingham road and a quantity of wines and spirits in two pillowcases – taken from the Star Inn – were recovered. He made a statement that two other men were involved in the “breaking”. He did not break in; he only drove the car, he said.

Speaking from the dock, Penrose said he was not trying to shield the others; in fact, he had friends who were trying to trace them. They engaged him to collect some stuff - he thought it was black market stuff.

Passing sentence, the Chairman said that the accused was not wholly unknown to him. “There is no question, you are rapidly developing into an habitual criminal”, he said. “If you go on as you are going, it will not be long before you are sent away for a long period of preventive detention”. He took part in the break, and whether he tried to trace the others or not was neither here nor there. He had the motor car to carry the things away.

 

Folkestone Gazette 16 September 1964.

Local News.

A total of £13 4/3 was collected by a pile of pennies at the Star Inn, Newington. It was pushed over on Monday night by Miss Folkestone, 20-year-old Miss Valerie Atkins, in her first official engagement. The pile took over nine months to build; the proceeds will go to the Spastics Society. The customers at the inn have now started another pile, which will be the third they have built.

 

Folkestone Gazette 24 June 1970.

Local News.

Thieves who broke into the Star Inn at Newington in the early hours of Saturday morning got away with about £50 in cash from a till. They are thought to have got in through a window at the side of the building.

 

Folkestone Herald 1 April 1978.

Local News.

Millions of customers have passed through the welcoming doors of the Star Inn at Newington since the pub first opened in the eighteenth century. But after Tuesday weary travellers, thirsty soldiers from nearby Shorncliffe Camp and a host of regulars will no longer be able to drop in for a refreshing pint or a meal. The pub will close its doors for the last time - in the name of progress.

Veteran landlord and landlady, Gerry and Flo Cross, will pull their last pints before leaving the pub after 20 years behind the bar. They will not be replaced because the old Star will be demolished. It will be crushed by the bulldozer to make room for link roads planned for the new M20 motorway. The nearby A20 road will become a flyover above the new stretch of the M20 route passing through Sellindge, Stanford and Newington.

The original pub, built in the 1700s, was rebuilt about 100 years ago. For years it has been popular with regulars, including many troops, as well as with motorists on their way to the sea and the Continent. A large car park, beer garden, swings and slides for the children made it an ideal stop for travellers.

For five years Mr. and Mrs. Cross, both aged 64, have lived under the cloud of demolition threats. When they hand over the pub keys to the Department of the Environment on Wednesday that threat will become a reality. “We are resigned to it, but nobody wanted it to happen”, Gerry told me. “Twice we have had compulsory purchase orders served on us. But nothing happened because of lack of money, but we have lost a lot of customers. We could have carried on for at least another five or six years, but it’s too late to start another business now”.

Mrs. Cross agreed that the move was sad, but inevitable. “We don’t want to go”, she said. “It has been our home for 20 years. I am quite happy to go on cooking shepherds pies for ever”.

There are two more friendly faces who will be missed, Alf Wollett, part-time barman for 25 years, and Mrs. Daisy Foss, barmaid for 19 years.

Gerry and Flo plan to take a well-earned holiday before moving to a bungalow in Folkestone. They have spent 30 years in the licensing trade, and were mine hosts at three pubs in Margate before moving to Newington. But they liked it at the Star so much, they never felt the urge to move again. “We have been here so long now, that often young soldiers come in and tell us that their dads used to drink here”, said Flo.

There is still uncertainty over what will happen about one of the pub’s most distinctive features, a mural in oils, which takes up one wall in the saloon bar. It depicts the pub’s interior and customers in days gone by. It is believed to be the only one left of five similar murals painted by an itinerant Irish artist who died in 1949.

I believe his name was Sean O’Leary. He asked no fee for his work, other than his keep and a drink at the bar. Apart from the Star, he wielded his brushes at the old Hotel Wampach, the old Pleasure Gardens Theatre, the Guildhall Hotel and the Black Horse at Swingfield. “I think our painting, which is very large, will have to go when the demolition men move in, but it will be a shame”, said Gerry.

 

Folkestone Herald 8 April 1978.

Local News.

Landlord of the Star Inn, Newington, stopped serving refreshments this week when the building was officially handed over to the Department of the Environment. The pub will eventually be pulled down in the name of progress - to make way for the M20 link roads, and mine hosts Flo and Gerry Cross are retiring.

The brewery’s area manager, Mr. John Norton, applied for a protection order, which was granted, at Folkestone Magistrates’ Court on Tuesday. There were a few sad faces in Court, including that of Inspector Peter Ford, who said “We would merely like to express our regrets at the passing of such an ancient monument”. The Inspector wished Mr. And Mrs. Cross best wishes in their retirement.

Mr. Norton said “Mr. Cross will be giving up his rights of interest”.

 

 

LICENSEE LIST

NASH Sarah 1750-64

NASK Elizabeth & Ann 1764-95

PAIN family 1795-1814

WELLS George 1814-19

WELLS Charles 1819-51 (age 60 in 1851Census)

WELLS George 1851-58+ (age 72 in 1851Census)

MAYCOCK Henry 1860+ (age 68 in 1881Census)

MAYCOCK Henry 1891-1905+ (age 42 in 1891Census) Kelly's 1903

MAYCOCK Albert 1905-32

NODDER Stanley 1932-35

GARRELL John 1935-41

HOARE George 1941-47

MERCER Thomas 1947-56

MORRIS Edwin 1956-58

CROSS Geoffrey 1958-70s

SHORTER/CROSS Jerry & Flo to 1978

 

Kelly's 1903From the Kelly's Directory 1903

CensusCensus

 

If anyone should have any further information, or indeed any pictures or photographs of the above licensed premises, please email:-

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