DOVER KENT ARCHIVES

Sort file:- Faversham, August, 2019.

Page Updated:- Monday, 12 August, 2019.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Paul Skelton

Earliest 1738-

Shipwright's Arms

Open 2019+

Hollow Shore

Faversham

01795 590008

http://www.theshipwrightsathollowshore.co.uk/

https://www.whatpub.com/shipwrights-arms

Shipwright's Arms 1910

Above photo, 1910, kindly sent by Michael Mirams.

Shipwright's Arms 1930

Above photo, circa 1930, kindly sent by Rory Kehoe.

Shipwright's Arms Shipwrights's Arms 1999

Above photograph 1999.

Shipwright's Arms painting

Above painting by R J Hills, date unknown.

Shipwright's Arms 2015

Above photo 2015.

Shipwrights Arms 2019

Above photo July 2019, kindly taken and sent by Rory Kehoe.

 

The "Shipwright's Arms" at Hollow Shore near Faversham (also been addressed as Luddenham, and in 1881 as next to the gunpowder works) has been a licensed house for three hundred years, and is situated on Faversham Creek next to a boatyard. It has featured in films and on television, with its resident ghost of an old sea-captain an undoubted attraction, but was nearly washed away in the floods of February 1953. In the 1960 I am informed that water was still drawn from an artesian well and the electricity supplied by a generator. One of the licensees wives in the 1960 was usually a little merry from drink and could be hard work. During this time a party was thrown here for a sailing ship bound for the Galapogus, free drink and food was offered as well as a band!

Surprisingly in a town with two breweries, the Shipwright's Arms was Faversham's only free house in the 1980s.

 

Taken from their website.

The "Shipwright's Arms" is well over 300 years old, although it is said that traces of an earlier building date back to the thirteenth century. Its beginnings may be shrouded by the mists of time, but we know the "Shipwright's" was first licensed in 1738, although it would have functioned as an Inn well before that.

Apart from serving Pirates and Smugglers, the pub was a well-known place for sailors and fisherman in the Thames estuary to stop and refresh themselves while waiting to go up to Faversham to unload their cargoes. In those days it would have been quite normal for an Inn serving mariners to provide "feminine comforts."

At one time the Inn was a Revenue Cutter Station, which would not have gone down well with those "Gentlemen of the night", who preferred their illicit activities to go unnoticed.

The pub has always had links to the Marine Agencies and the current landlord keeps tradition by acting as a "reporting member" to the coastguard.

Originally, Hallowshore was named "Holy Shore" by a Viking King. (Viking literally translates as "a pirate lurking up a creek.")

Adjacent to the pub is Testers Boatyard, which continues a tradition of wooden boat building. Although the yard is closed to the public for safety reasons, traditional boats may be seen entering and leaving the creek when the tide is right.

All the above have left their mark, and the pub interior and decoration bear witness to its past. (Come and meet "Hollow Shore Harry," resting in his own corner of the pub.

The present owners are trying to maintain the pub as traditionally as possible, so you will find no TV, pool table or darts.

When you visit the "Shipwright's" you step back in time. have a drink in one of our many crooks, examine the many artefacts reflecting the pubs maritime past and enjoy real ale served by gravity straight from the cask as it has been for centuries.

Our aim is to retain the "Shipwright's" as a traditional pub, where good food is available, but to do this we need your custom all the year round. So when you fancy a quiet drink or meal in the depths of winter why not come out and enjoy it in front of one of our log fires.

In the summer, our garden is a popular meeting place, where you can watch the birds in comfort with a drink at your side.

 

Taken from http://www.ghost-story.co.uk

The Shipwrights Arms, Faversham, Kent

An isolated and remote setting, amidst marshland and mud flats gives the 300 year old "Shipwrights Arms" a timeless aura. Numerous patrons and staff have witnessed the ghost of a sailor, wearing a large thick coat and with red glowing eyes.

Either walking or driving from Faversham, its white-weather boarded exterior is visible from a considerable distance. Most of the detail of its history has disappeared into history, just a little is known. It is a least 300 years old. Probably an inn for a very long time, its existence was legalised in 1738, when it was first licensed. It can be assumed that the inn had led a colourful history, with smugglers and pirates as customers, along with the fishermen and sailors.

The Shipwrights Arms has a single bar adorned with nautical fittings. The pub is oozing with character with its low beamed ceilings, narrow doorways, there are lots of places to hide and have a quiet drink.

During the Winter months on cold and stormy nights, numerous patrons and staff at the "Shipwrights Arms" have witnessed the ghost of a thick set sailor, wearing a large thick coat, peaked hat and with red glowing eyes. Preceding the ghostly apparition is usually the overwhelming smell of rum, tar and tobacco. A sharp drop in temperature is usually felt just before the apparition manifests.

The ghost is thought to be that of a 19th century Captain of a ship that sank in the Swale on a cold winters night. The captain managed to make it to land, clambering on to the mud flats and dragging himself up to the lights of the weather-boarded cottage. Tired and cold he banged on the door asking for help.

The landlord unwilling to open the door at such a late hour fearing smugglers or pirates shouted at him to leave. The landlord found the sailors dead body the next morning on his doorstep. The Captains spirit has never left.

Landlords at the "Shipwright Arms" have since, have heard loud banging on the door in the early hours of morning, on investigating there is never anyone there. One former landlady awoke many a night to see the ghost of the Captain standing at the bottom of her bed, glaring at her with bright red eyes. Barry Tester a former landlord at the property awoke one cold winters night to find the ghost had climbed into bed with him, it disappeared after several horrific seconds.

The apparition has also been seen in a small room that adjoining the bar, many customers have been startled when the bearded phantom suddenly enters the room then vanishes right in front of them. If you visit this haunted pub take along a camera and see if you can photograph some of the orbs that are often reported in the pub.

 

Taken from http://legendarykent.wix.com/ghosts#!shipwrights-arms

The "Shipwrights Arms" building is at least 300 years old and has probably been an inn for most of that time, its existence was legalised in 1738, when it was first licensed. It can be assumed that the inn had led a colourful history, with smugglers and pirates as customers, along with the fishermen and sailors. During the Winter many at the "Shipwrights Arms" have witnessed the ghost of a thick set sailor, wearing a large thick coat, peaked hat and with red glowing eyes. Preceding the ghostly apparition is usually the overwhelming smell of rum, tar and tobacco. A sharp drop in temperature is usually felt just before the apparition manifests. The ghost is thought to be that of a 19th century Captain of a ship that sank in the Swale on a cold winters night. The captain managed to make it to land, clambering on to the mud flats and dragging himself up to the lights of the weather-boarded cottage. Tired and cold he banged on the door asking for help, the landlord unwilling to open the door at such a late hour fearing smugglers or pirates shouted at him to leave. He found the sailors dead body the next morning on his doorstep. The Captains spirit has never left. Landlords at the "Shipwright Arms" have since, have heard loud banging on the door in the early hours of morning, on investigating there is never anyone there. One former landlady awoke many a night to see the ghost of the Captain standing at the bottom of her bed, glaring at her with bright red eyes. Barry Tester a former landlord at the property awoke one cold winters night to find the ghost had climbed into bed with him, it disappeared after several horrific seconds.

 

LICENSEE LIST

TRITTON John 1841+ (age 40 in 1841Census)

MADAMS Thomas 1858-61+ (age 54 in 1861Census)

CLARK Herbert 1881-82+ (also Mariner age 45 in 1881Census)

DANE George 1891+

GREGORY George 1901+ (age 44 in 1901Census)

ADSLEY George 1911+ (age 56 in 1911Census)

DANE Isaac 1913-22+

JACKSON George 1930+

EVANS Walter 1938+ Post Office Directory 1938

JOBEY Jack Reginald 1961+ London Gazette

TESTER Barry ????

http://pubshistory.com/ShipwrightsArms.shtml

http://pubshistory.com/ShipwrightsArms1.shtml

 

Post Office Directory 1938From the Post Office Directory 1938

CensusCensus

 

If anyone should have any further information, or indeed any pictures or photographs of the above licensed premises, please email:-

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