DOVER KENT ARCHIVES

Sort file:- Sevenoaks, April, 2021.

Page Updated:- Sunday, 18 April, 2021.

PUB LIST PUBLIC HOUSES Paul Skelton & Tessa Leeds

Earliest 1838

Plough

Latest 1962

Church Road

Sevenoaks Weald

Everest Farm 1990 formerly Plough

Above photo, 1990, kindly sent by Tessa Leeds.

Former Plough 2009, now Everest Farm

Above photo 2009 by N Chadwick Creative Commons Licence. Showing what is now Everest farm.

 

I am informed that the building was erected in 1838 it was owned by a branch of the local Paige family: William Paige (a farmer) was shown as a beer retailer in 1858. It closed in 1962, and is now known as Everest Farm.

 

Local knowledge, pictures, and licensee information would be appreciated.

I will be adding the historical information when I find or are sent it, but this project is a very big one, and I do not know when or where the information will come from.

All emails are answered.

 

PUBLIC HOUSES OF THE WEALD by Tessa Leeds.

The Weald, like many other villages, once boasted more Public Houses that it does in the present day. The reason for there being so many in the first place was due to the Government passing The Beer Shop Act of 1830. This Act enabled virtually any householder to produce beer on his/her own premises for sale, providing that an annual excise fee was paid.

 

THE PLOUGH. Church Road.

Now known as Everest Farm, this beer shop was owned by a branch of the Paige family. It is thought to have been built c.1838, but it is not known when it opened for the sale of beer and cider. There was no bar, but the front room, entered via the front door, was used. Eli Paige supplied quoits and clay pigeon shooting on the ground to the rear, which also contained grass tennis courts. Eli had other occupations besides brewing and farming as he was also the local coal merchant.

After the death of her father, Miss Dorothy Paige took over both the coal business and The Plough. Known affectionately by the local lads as Dolly, but never to her face, she could be coaxed, by application of a free drink, to give a rendition of 'Sucking Cider Through a Straw'. As this was the Saturday evening high spot, the fire often left unlit and the wooden tables and chairs lacking comfort, the clientele gradually diminished. At Christmas Dolly held a compulsory raffle. Anyone entering the house had to buy a ticket before they were allowed to leave. The prize would be a cockerel. However, on winning, the lucky person would be told to catch their own prize. As it was invariably dark the prize often lasted more than one raffle. In 1949, due to the death of Tom, her horse, Miss Paige gave up the coal business which was taken over by the firm of Marchants. She continued to run The Plough until early 1963.

Further notes.

The Plough Church Road was always a beer shop owned by the Paige Family who also ran the coal business until their horse died around the time of WW2 when they gave the coal business to Marchants. Dolly Paige sold beer and cider from a hatch in the front room and would sing 'sucking cider through a straw' if bought a drink. My Gt gt Grandfather Pretty Boy Sceal and his brother occupied a seat either side of the fireplace for many a night and my uncle Rosie (Frank) was also a regular. Dolly kept a cockerel and chicken and had a dilapidated grass tennis court she also had three residential caravans (not owned by her) in the field. Miss Con Gullick, an artist lived in one for many years for several years in the 1950 - 60, when she was very old she moved to Brighton and lived well into her 90's. Philip Moysey lived in a gypsy caravan whose original owners family called many years to ask to burn it, he had been a pal of Brendan Behan the Irish poet. After the war he had bought the van and lived in Teynham in Swale where the locals were not friendly. One of Alice, my grandmother, brothers (Frank Sceal who married Lily Levens from Ide Hill and whose wedding photos I have) was the blacksmith there and told him to come to the Weald where people were more friendly. He travelled the country a couple of times bringing his younger wife, Gillian, to live in the village. He lived in the village in the 1960's and then moved into a house in Church road until his death. Shirley and John Partington Smith moved into the spot where the Moyeys had been in showman wagons. The third caravan was at one time occupied by Peter and Pauline Sargent until they moved to Gilchirst Cottages. Dollies cockerel was the same one used each year in her Christmas raffle, the winner was told it was out in the yard and they would need to go and catch the vicious beast on a dark night when the raffle was called, no one ever did. After Dolly the Sedgewicks bought and renovated the property which originally had four fields but not all of them belonged to Dolly, some were her siblings. Sedgewicks got half of one of the fields. Salmons directory of 1936 has Mrs Paige as the Coal Merchant and David Marchant said he thought it was so until 1949 (he ran Marchants Coal Office so should know).

 

From https://themovemarket.com accessed 12 April 2021.

Everest Farm, Church Road is a 6 bedroom freehold detached house - it is ranked as the most expensive property in TN14 6LU, with a valuation of 1,657,000.

Since it last sold in January 2002 for 665,000, its value has increased by 992,000.

Everest Farm 2021

Above photo 2021.

Everest Farm 2021

Above photo 2021.

Everest Farm 2021

Above photo 2021.

Everest Farm 2021

Above photo 2021.

Everest Farm 2021

Above photo 2021.

Everest Farm 2021

Above photo 2021.

Everest Farm 2021

Above photo 2021.

Everest Farm 2021

Above photo 2021.

 

LICENSEE LIST

PAIGE William 1858-71+ (also farmer age 55 in 1871Census)

PAIGE Charlotte (widow) 1881+ (age 63 in 1881Census)

PAIGE Eli 1918-30+

PAIGE Annie Eliza 1938+

PAIGE Dorothy to 1963

https://pubwiki.co.uk/Plough.shtml

 

CensusCensus

 

If anyone should have any further information, or indeed any pictures or photographs of the above licensed premises, please email:-

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